Author Topic: Weekend Update 5/10/20  (Read 10320 times)

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wcfn100

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #120 on: May 14, 2020, 12:23:49 PM »
0
Apparently the engineers on diesel or electric  passenger locos were expendable since the '30s, since Es, GG1s, DL109s, EP-4s, Sharknoses, C-liners and PAs all had front end cabs?

Yep, those guys were totally expendable.

Jason

Dave V

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #121 on: May 14, 2020, 12:58:41 PM »
+4
Apparently the engineers on diesel or electric  passenger locos were expendable since the '30s, since Es, GG1s, DL109s, EP-4s, Sharknoses, C-liners and PAs all had front end cabs?

Haven't seen a front-end cab GG1 before...

davefoxx

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #122 on: May 14, 2020, 02:11:42 PM »
+1
Apparently the engineers on diesel or electric  passenger locos were expendable since the '30s, since Es, GG1s, DL109s, EP-4s, Sharknoses, C-liners and PAs all had front end cabs?

GG1s did not have cabs at the ends of the locomotive, and its center cab design was passed along to a predecessor in the PRR fleet, the Class P5a locomotives, after a grade crossing accident killed the crew of a P5a.  The P5a originally had cabs at the end, but the entire class was rebuilt (and subsequent locomotives built) with the redesigned center cab.

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nkalanaga

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #123 on: May 14, 2020, 03:40:28 PM »
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Also, most passenger locos still had a "nose", usually with some form of collision post(s), so the cab didn't take the full impact.  That's one of the reasons freight hood units usually have something in front of the cab.
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tehachapifan

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #124 on: May 14, 2020, 03:44:17 PM »
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The long hood vs. short hood forward debate is definitely one where I can see it both ways (pardon the pun). While I get the argument about putting all that mass between the offending object and the crew, it sure seems like the trade-off would be a really significant reduction in visibility. This said, I'm not a RR worker, so this is speculation on my part.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2020, 03:48:38 PM by tehachapifan »

SD452XR

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #125 on: May 14, 2020, 04:00:42 PM »
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I never liked running loco’s long hood forward or with high nose like the SD9’s. I wanted to be able to see. Those units were also loud so it was hard sometimes to hear the conductor when calling out signals.

CRL

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #126 on: May 14, 2020, 06:25:58 PM »
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It all depends what you run into.

rickb773

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #127 on: May 14, 2020, 08:24:21 PM »
+1
This isn't me trying to be a smart a$$, but why did PRR run their diesels long nose forward?
The railroads in my area seemed to think of diesels as straight steam engine replacements and the steamers certainly had the cab at the rear of the engine. PRSL's Baldwin AS-16's definitely had the long hood stenciled being the front end. It wasn't until the arrival of their GP-38's that the cab end was considered (and stenciled as) the front end and they still ran long end first a lot of the time.

I think the part of the country the railroad ran in was also a consideration. The PRSL in southern NJ seemed to have a grade crossing every half mile and a lot of automobile  driver's that needed to be removed from the gene pool.


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Cajonpassfan

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #128 on: May 15, 2020, 12:19:31 AM »
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I think you’ve nailed it...compared to the extremely constrained forward visibility out of a big boilered steam loco, the AS-16’s were easy, even long hood forward. Took a while to figure out short hood was even better...change comes gradually, kicking and screamin’
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Tom Todd

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #129 on: May 15, 2020, 02:26:02 AM »
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I read somewhere long time ago that it was the collective bargaining units, unions, at each railroad that determined if a railroad ran long or short hood forward.
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DKS

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #130 on: May 15, 2020, 08:57:08 AM »
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I think this might be the coolest project I’ve ever seen.

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Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #131 on: May 15, 2020, 09:24:13 AM »
-1
The railroads in my area seemed to think of diesels as straight steam engine replacements and the steamers certainly had the cab at the rear of the engine. PRSL's Baldwin AS-16's definitely had the long hood stenciled being the front end. It wasn't until the arrival of their GP-38's that the cab end was considered (and stenciled as) the front end and they still ran long end first a lot of the time.

And amusingly in that case, even THOSE were setup with dual controls so they could easily be run LHF.

CRL

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Re: Weekend Update 5/10/20
« Reply #132 on: May 15, 2020, 01:58:39 PM »
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Running long hood forward was just overcompensating for other shortcomings.