Author Topic: Handrail of Caboose  (Read 667 times)

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0303fxm

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Handrail of Caboose
« on: May 28, 2022, 12:03:48 AM »
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Hi,

I have a question on most US cabooses; that is a purpose of circular arc shaped handrails equipped on bodysides near steps as I do not imagine of the usage.

Just for your ref, have attached my picture of favorite GN caboose being decaled to an Overland N model years ago. See white/black striped handrails.

Thank you for your time and response.

Ryoichi Fukushima
Yokohama, Japan

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Spades

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2022, 01:11:18 AM »
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Genki kai Ryoichi Fukushima San

Just guessing it is a hand rail as you step up from the ground to the bottom of the first step.  American and I am sure all railways right of way (tracks) are pretty much sloped for drainage which means a pretty big rise in height.  If you place the caboose on a piece of unitrack place a n scale figure next to it.  You will see how one would have to step up, the side grab handrail is curved up to act as a handrail during the climb up or down.
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« Last Edit: May 28, 2022, 02:44:27 PM by Spades »

Hawghead

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2022, 03:37:34 PM »
+1
Hi,

I have a question on most US cabooses; that is a purpose of circular arc shaped handrails equipped on bodysides near steps as I do not imagine of the usage.

Just for your ref, have attached my picture of favorite GN caboose being decaled to an Overland N model years ago. See white/black striped handrails.

Thank you for your time and response.

Ryoichi Fukushima
Yokohama, Japan

,



I think you'll find the purpose was to make it easier to swing up onto and down off of the caboose as it was moving.  In the bottom picture imagine you are standing in the lower right hand corner of the picture near the track.  As the caboose passes by from left to right, you reach up with your right hand and grab the lower portion of the rear curved grab iron letting it kind of slide through your hand as the caboose passes.  Then you place your left foot in the lower rear corner of the bottom step and left hand on the rear vertical grab iron.  As the caboose continues to move by, you push yourself up with up with your left leg (although you don't really have to push up as the motion will tend to lift you up) while at the same time pulling yourself up with your arms and the motion will lift your right leg up off the ground and you climb the steps onto the platform.  Getting off, just repeat in the opposite order, remembering the leg opposite of the direction of motion (or trailing leg) goes down on the ground first.  With a little practice it becomes one fluid motion you don't even have to think about.

When I first hired on the adage was "On at 10 off at 15".  While on at 10 isn't to bad, off at 15 is more of a leap than a step down.  ;) you better have some running room when you do it.  It's funny how the railroads have come full circle on the subject of getting on and off moving equipment.  When I first hired on it was common practice and was taught in new hire class.  Then it became against the rules, but everyone still did it and no one cared.  Then the rules against it were strictly enforced, and now we are back to the operating rules allowing it.

Scott
There's a prototype for everything.
If you can't make it perfect, make it adjustable.
DCC is not plug-n-play.

0303fxm

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2022, 09:48:02 PM »
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Hello Spades and Scott,

Thank you so much for your replies.

Scott:
Appreciate your detailed explanation and specific description.
I understand you used to work in a railroad company.
Also understand the arc handrail is generally for getting on/off moving equipment.
If you give me a short movie of how to get on/off a caboose so that I can easily see the actions much more as your sentence is hard for me to imagine these actions :?.

Thanks again guys.

Ryoichi Fukushima

wazzou

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2022, 10:10:06 PM »
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Bryan

Member of NPRHA, Modeling Committee Member
http://www.nprha.org/
Member of MRHA


Chris333

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2022, 10:27:24 PM »
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Old head.  :scared:

Hawghead

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2022, 04:09:08 PM »
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Quote
I understand you used to work in a railroad company.

Still do.

Scott
There's a prototype for everything.
If you can't make it perfect, make it adjustable.
DCC is not plug-n-play.

0303fxm

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2022, 06:41:59 PM »
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Bryan:
Thanks for your movie.  The contents are very interesting though the film does not have a topic of arc shaped handrails of a caboose.

Scott:
Noted w/ thanks.

R. Fukushima


John

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2022, 07:54:42 PM »
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This topic was also discussed here .. 

https://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/13/t/65301.aspx

Also

 12

If the construction prescribed for 'Caboose Cars without Platforms' at all resembled or was even approximately the equivalent of the construction of express or mail cars in the respects essential to the safety and promptness of service on the rear end of fast trains, or if it appeared that such cabooses are or could be used on such trains, the inference might be justified, but the difference between the two is radical and fundamental. As thus: The illustrations in the record show that mail and express cars have only narrow stirrups and single handholds at the side doors and at their ends, and the ends are equipped with vestibule frames, which render access difficult and dangerous to the brake wheel and markers (signal lights and flags) and to the handholds and stirrups for mounting or alighting. But the requisites prescribed for a 'Caboose without Platform' are a curved and a straight handhold on opposite sides of each side door and 'Side-Door Steps' under each door, with a minimum length of five feet, a minimum width of six inches, a minimum height of backstop of three inches, and hung a maximum height of only twenty-four inches from the top of rail, Such handholds, with such a long, wide and lowhanging step give facilities for mounting or alighting from such a caboose, when in motion, comparable in safety to those of an end platform, and are obviously much better and safer than those on mail or express cars.[/b]

https://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/250/566


also see

https://www.ecfr.gov/current/title-49/subtitle-B/chapter-II/part-231/section-231.11

(k) Side-door handholds  -

(1) Number.  Four: Two curved, two straight.

(2) Dimensions.  Minimum diameter, five-eighths of an inch, wrought iron or steel. Minimum clearance, 2, preferably 21⁄2 inches.

(3) Location.

(i) One curved handhold, from a point at side of each door opposite ladder, not less than 36 inches above bottom of car, curving away from door downward to a point not more than 6 inches above bottom of car.

(ii) One vertical handhold at ladder side of each door from a point not less than 36 inches above bottom of car to a point not more than 6 inches above level of bottom of door.

(iii) Carriers are not required to change the location of handholds on cars in service July 1, 1911, except end handholds under end sills, where the appliances are within 3 inches of the required location, except that when cars undergo regular repairs they must then be made to comply with the standards prescribed.

(4) Manner of application.  Side-door handholds shall be securely fastened with not less than 1⁄2-inch bolts with nuts outside (when possible) and riveted over or with not less than 1⁄2-inch rivets.


0303fxm

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2022, 09:05:59 PM »
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Thanks Ed and John for your posting.

The posts are so official and professional for me.
The MR Caboose grab iron article is easy to understand.

Regards,

R. Fukushima

Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2022, 09:13:00 PM »
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I could get into a whole host of details, but there's a fascinating amount of history to railroad safety.

This Wikipedia article is a good jumping off point.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_Safety_Appliance_Act#:~:text=The%20Safety%20Appliance%20Act%20is,a%20seven%2Dyear%20grace%20period.

Chris333

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2022, 09:40:20 PM »
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I know there was a law in Ohio that cabooses needed to have a cupola.

John

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2022, 05:39:32 AM »
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Thanks Ed and John for your posting.

The posts are so official and professional for me.
The MR Caboose grab iron article is easy to understand.

Regards,

R. Fukushima

You are welcome .. It was a great question - I learned something new from all the responses.  The curved railing does give you improved hand hold capability especially when the object is moving ..

Mark5

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Re: Handrail of Caboose
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2022, 07:16:41 AM »
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I know there was a law in Ohio that cabooses needed to have a cupola.

Close. "with either a cupola or with bay windows"

https://codes.ohio.gov/ohio-revised-code/section-4963.21