Author Topic: Film developing  (Read 582 times)

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jpec

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Film developing
« on: January 02, 2019, 08:52:23 PM »
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This might be a little off topic but I was cleaning out some bins in the basement and found 3 rolls of 35mm film. They've been in the cool dark of my basement and the last time I remember using film was around '98. One is CVS film and the other 2 are those Seattle Film Works freebies they use to send like AOL sent internet discs. Does anyone develop this off brand stuff any more and what would be the odds anything would have survived?
Thanks for your insight...
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MK

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2019, 07:55:11 AM »
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Yes, people still develop them.  You didn't say what type of film.  I'm going to assume color negatives and not slides?  I remember the Seattle Film Works freebie that was given away so you can then send it back to them to develop.  They didn't use real color film negatives but rather movie film which they roll their own.  But I digress...

I believe Duggal in NYC develops film.  Also Unique Photo in Fairfield, NJ.  Both have websites.  I don't know how much they charge.  In terms of whether anything will survive, it's hard to say.  I say 50/50.  :D

C855B

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2019, 08:40:23 AM »
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First, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_FilmWorks . Developing is a special process you are unlikely to find "just anywhere", if at all.

I have a hunch that the CVS film may be E-6 (Ektachrome or Ektacolor equivalent), an easy-ish chemistry for in-store processing. But don't quote me on that.
...mike

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learmoia

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2019, 10:41:04 AM »
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Google "develop Seattle film works film" and there are 2 places that come up..  "The Camera Shop" and "Rocky Mountain Film Labs".

The process is ECN-II for Seattle stuff..

I would assume either place can also do the CVS stuff as well.

~Ian
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railnerd

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2019, 02:16:09 PM »
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For folks in the greater Bay Area, some of my former co-workers started a hipster development studio in Santa Cruz, CA.

http://www.specialeditionartproject.com

jpec

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2019, 03:05:03 PM »
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Thanks for the information, much appreciated.

Jeff
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Lenny53

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2019, 07:40:05 PM »
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I used to manage a retail / commercial photo lab.   Most 25mm film sold these days is C41 colour negative print and is the type of film processed by pharmacies.  Labs that process E6 colour positive film (slides) are not as common these days as the demand is no longer there and the chemicals used are less tolerant in regards to temperature variance.  Having said that, film is 20 years is not likely to turn out as the chemical composition of the film has deteriorated beyond the point of being usable.

jpec

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Re: Film developing
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2019, 07:42:47 PM »
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Thank you
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