Author Topic: superelevated track?  (Read 1117 times)

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Jeff AKA St0rm

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superelevated track?
« on: February 10, 2014, 08:28:36 PM »
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I am looking to superelevate our clubs layout curves. What is the size of the shim i need to use on the outside of the curves? Minimum radius is 20".

Jeff

kelticsylk

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2014, 09:09:27 PM »
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I use 0.020 styrene strips. I push them under the track after it is laid and temporarily held down with track nails. I set them under the outer rail. I create transitions by moving the strip gradually towards the end of the ties. The track is then permanently fastened down with ballast.

primavw

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2014, 11:21:59 PM »
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Not sure if you want to go this route, but I have had great success with masking tape:



Probably a bit less work than cutting shims, but I'm not sure because I have not gone that route. I would venture a guess that its CHEAPER than using styrene.

Here is a link to the site I used for a DIY:
http://csxdixieline.blogspot.com/2009/04/howto-superelevate-track.html
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 11:23:35 PM by primavw »
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glakedylan

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 11:25:39 PM »
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0.025" seems to be something of a standard in N Scale
there is of course the need to transition into that amount both in and out
whatever thicknesses of styrene will provide for all of that should work fine
using a track gauge to make sure the rails stay within gauge will be helpful
the styrene or material used being only under the outer rail and the ties of
the track not being skewed or bent
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robert3985

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2014, 03:22:47 AM »
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I've done it two different ways.  The first way was to sand my cork roadbed into an angle, checking it with an inclinometer I used to use for calibrating my big 12' satellite dish (remember them?).  That worked pretty good.

Now I use 1/2" long by 1/8" strips of masking tape, marking off the curve in 1" increments on the edges of my subroadbed and placing these little strips on those inch marks underneath the ties on the outside of the curve.  The first mark is the beginning of the curve and gets no tape, the second inch gets 1 strip, the second inch gets two stacked strips, the third inch gets three stacked strips and the fourth inch and everything beyond, until the curve ends, gets four stacked strips (.020" high).     The "grade" is always the same from zero to .020" in 4".

Since I use Micro Engineering (actually Rail Craft) flex track, I don't have any nail holes, so I use medium viscosity CA for the raised outside edge of the track and watery CA for the inside, with liberal use of Accelerator and a 1500 Watt hair dryer to evaporate the Accelerator quickly.

Since CA doesn't stick too well to Delrin, I don't consider the track truly glued down until it's ballasted.

Here's a photo of Echo Curve that I've posted before using my inclinometer and sanded cork roadbed for superelevation.  My son's SP MT-4 is running in UP territory on this day:


Looks pretty steep, and I'm sure it's a bit more superelevation than the equivalent of a .020" spacer on the underside ties, but here's a prototype photo of a modern engine in the same place I'm modeling:


Looks pretty close, and I have zero operational problems at this spot.  The curve is about a 36" radius (don't know for sure since it's a big spirally eased curve, with only about a 6" long fixed radius curve at the apex.





Jeff AKA St0rm

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2014, 11:42:13 AM »
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thanks guys. looks like .020 it is.

oakcreekco

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2014, 11:57:35 AM »
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I used plastic strips/shims, under the outside edge of the roadbed. IIRC, it was about .040.

I drew a line where the edge would be, then glued down the strips, and sanded the transitions. Filled in the area with Durum's Water Puddy so it was nice and flat.

Glued down the roadbed, and layed the flextrack. Works fine, and it's been 10+ years of no problems.

I may have overthought the process doing it this way, but I'm a believer in Super Elevating now.
A "western modeler" that also runs NS.

R.Groff

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2014, 04:05:59 PM »
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Can the bench work be used to give the angles needed.
Rick

davefoxx

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2014, 05:35:29 PM »
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Can the bench work be used to give the angles needed.
Rick

That's difficult to do with accuracy.  The subroadbed, if you use plywood cookie-cutter construction can twist, so you would have to put risers in often to keep the superelevation consistent.  It's much easier and more accurate to shim the track.  I use layers of masking tape under the outside rail, similar to that described in a previous post to this thread.

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oakcreekco

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Re: superelevated track?
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2014, 10:52:29 AM »
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That's difficult to do with accuracy.  The subroadbed, if you use plywood cookie-cutter construction can twist, so you would have to put risers in often to keep the superelevation consistent.  It's much easier and more accurate to shim the track.  I use layers of masking tape under the outside rail, similar to that described in a previous post to this thread.

DFF

Agreed, that would be a tough way to do it.

I built my runaround using foam, and for roadbed I used Vinylbed sub roadbed and roadbed.  I laid the sub roadbed first, marked the OD for the top roadbed, then did what was needed for the super elevation shims.
A "western modeler" that also runs NS.