Author Topic: Farm House  (Read 2834 times)

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AlkemScaleModels

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Farm House
« on: May 14, 2010, 11:50:38 PM »
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I took a break from benchwork and track laying to build a structure.



This farmhouse is based loosely on the Lydia Leister House at Gettysburg. I put some construction notes here:
http://usmrr.blogspot.com/2010/05/building-farm-house.html

Caleb Austin

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2010, 03:25:08 PM »
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Looks Awesome. I love the flaky paint.

Sokramiketes

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2010, 04:58:52 PM »
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Agreed, neat weathering, but brings up the question, was it weathered during the ACW or did it look pretty new back then?

Like a real roof, I'd suggest a half width started strip of shingles for the first row, so that the first full layer doesn't look like it's at a different angle than the rest of the field of the roof.

John

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2010, 08:38:57 PM »
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Its also just as likely that the paint was whitewash, or raw wood ..


AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2010, 09:13:05 PM »
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Agreed, neat weathering, but brings up the question, was it weathered during the ACW or did it look pretty new back then?

Like a real roof, I'd suggest a half width started strip of shingles for the first row, so that the first full layer doesn't look like it's at a different angle than the rest of the field of the roof.



I defer to the roofers out there, is Mike's suggestion the correct way to do this?  I was able to research the ridge caps and figure out how that was done. Also note that the prototype Leister house had double overlapped shingles on the main hosue. I don't know any way to do that other than one by one.


AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2010, 09:14:30 PM »
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Its also just as likely that the paint was whitewash, or raw wood ..



The Liester house paint was in better shape than my model, but I am assuming that my farm was in occupied territory for a few years, so maintenance was deferred. Plus I thought it looked cool.

ednadolski

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2010, 11:10:41 PM »
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That looks terrific!    I can't see in the pic, but are there any porch steps behind the figures?  Also, if you have any, I'd love to see a pic or two showing the flashing around the chimney (always a weak point for me).

Weathering looks really good too, esp. the peeling paint.   Just a few very minor nits: would it be appropriate to have some vertical rain streaks on the foundation, and maybe some lifting shingles?

Ed




GaryHinshaw

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2010, 12:42:38 AM »
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Excellent model.  I really like the windows too.  Do the sashes open?

John

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2010, 07:13:11 AM »
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The Liester house paint was in better shape than my model, but I am assuming that my farm was in occupied territory for a few years, so maintenance was deferred. Plus I thought it looked cool.

I agree .. it looks really cool .. my only point is that what I can find online would lead me to believe that the paint "faded" more than blistered .. since it was likely "milk paint" - a mixture of milk, lime, and pigments. Blistering is probably more associated with latex or oil based paint .. It may have even been "whitewash" .. lime and water mixture, which over time just washes away.

Quote
The first recorded paint mill in America was established in Boston in 1700 by Thomas Child, who had emigrated from England. His business manufactured the components of paint in a paste form. During most of the nineteenth century, professional painters mixed their own paints from linseed oil, white lead, turpentine, and pigments. Their formulas were inconsistent, and the paint they produced had virtually no shelf life.

http://business.highbeam.com/industry-reports/chemicals/paints-varnishes-lacquers-enamels-allied-products


tom mann

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2010, 08:22:39 AM »
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Did you use the "masking tape over partially dry paint" technique?

AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2010, 10:51:35 AM »
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Did you use the "masking tape over partially dry paint" technique?

No. I primed the whole structure with Rustoleum gray. Then brush painted white craft acrylic in thin coats. I scraped with an X-acto knife.

As for peeling paint, I was inspired by an out building at City Point National Park.  This is a restored period structure. Note the shingle treatment at the ridge.


Dave V

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2010, 10:58:13 AM »
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I think it looks GREAT.  As an ACW buff and former reenactor myself, I've poured over many period photographs.  It's surprising how weathered relatively "new" structures often are in these photos.  As was mentioned earlier, wooden structures weren't painted with today's weather-proof enamels, but with crappy whitewash that came off in the rain.

Looks right on the money, Bernie!

AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2010, 11:18:57 AM »
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Here is a 1860s era photo showing a structure with weathered paint like I did on my model.



AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2010, 11:20:19 AM »
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I think it looks GREAT.  As an ACW buff and former reenactor myself, I've poured over many period photographs.  It's surprising how weathered relatively "new" structures often are in these photos.  As was mentioned earlier, wooden structures weren't painted with today's weather-proof enamels, but with crappy whitewash that came off in the rain.

Looks right on the money, Bernie!

You'll have to wear your uniform if you ever come over to visit or operate.

Dave V

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2010, 11:27:27 AM »
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And on the left:

« Last Edit: May 16, 2010, 11:30:08 AM by Dave Vollmer »