Author Topic: Farm House  (Read 2833 times)

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AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2010, 12:08:25 PM »
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Great shots. Looks authentic.

I went for a BG uniform simulating BG Haupt, Superintendent of the USMRR.


AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2010, 12:33:40 PM »
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That general looks a little too weathered. He shouldn't be that old and fat. ;)
« Last Edit: May 16, 2010, 12:37:52 PM by AlkemScaleModels »

sizemore

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2010, 09:27:04 AM »
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Using my magic....



The S.

CVSNE

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2010, 10:32:38 AM »
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House looks cool - but does General Meade know you stole his HQ???? ;D

May want to consider another small house, still existing for another spot on the layout - the Chandler Plantation "office" - today it's the Jackson shrine. http://www.nps.gov/frsp/js.htm

There's also the replica of the McLean house at Manassas - and of course, the Stone House - both of which are at the battlefield.

They are at least Virginia buildings.

Marty

Modeling (or attempting to model) the Central Vermont circa October 1954  . . .

Bob Bufkin

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2010, 01:15:28 PM »
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I thought I have seen that house somewhere.  I've also visited most of the houses mentioned.  My favorite old Virginia house is Lee's mantion in Arlington.

AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2010, 07:49:36 PM »
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House looks cool - but does General Meade know you stole his HQ???? ;D

May want to consider another small house, still existing for another spot on the layout - the Chandler Plantation "office" - today it's the Jackson shrine. http://www.nps.gov/frsp/js.htm

There's also the replica of the McLean house at Manassas - and of course, the Stone House - both of which are at the battlefield.

They are at least Virginia buildings.

Marty



The Robinson House at Bull Run is a very similar to this house. This was a very common style across the US during the ACW. So it is probable that one like it was in my area.




As I said, this isn't an exact copy of the Leister House. But if I were to do a kit, it would be the Leister House more accurately done.

As to the examples of homes at Manassas, The stone house would be cool, but I don't think stone houses were as common in Stafford County. During the ACW it was one of the least populated counties in eastern Va. It was that way until the last ten years, when it became a suburb of DC.

The Jackson Shrine house is a good candidate for my layout. I understand you can go inside too when you visit. It would be great to have the house where Jackson died, and thus the Union saved, immortalized on my layout.


AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2010, 10:15:29 AM »
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Using my magic....



The S.

Not bad, but it resembles a grainy newspaper  photo more than a civil war era print.

One thing I am amazed by is the quality of the ACW images at the National Archives. These guys used home made 8x10 silver-gelatin glass negatives. While the lenses may not have been perfect, the detail captured in the prints is incredible. Try it yourself, check out these links. Download the 104MB files and zoom in.

http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/item/cwp2003000897/PP/?sid=0a22451f40e6dbb993bd2b85adf9d8ee

Try reading the print on the barrels in the photo below:.


http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/item/cwp2003004869/PP/?sid=daadec4b208ad11ebf8bb67b8a297c45



Sokramiketes

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Re: Farm House
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2010, 10:35:04 AM »
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I defer to the roofers out there, is Mike's suggestion the correct way to do this?  I was able to research the ridge caps and figure out how that was done. Also note that the prototype Leister house had double overlapped shingles on the main hosue. I don't know any way to do that other than one by one.

That's how we did it with my garage roof and modern asphalt shingles last year.  The starter strip was laid backwards/flipped, then the first course went over that, so all courses were overlapping something.  I presume they did the same thing with other types of shingled roofs back then, and in looking at the photos you're posting, the lack of a change in angle on the first course seems to indicate something was done.  On models I usually don't worry about it, but I recently used the Northeastern laser cut shingles on a building and they are a little thick, so it was necessary to do the starter strip.  In O it seems to be noticeable as well.

As for peeling paint, I was inspired by an out building at City Point National Park.  This is a restored period structure. Note the shingle treatment at the ridge.



Probably restored with modern paint though.

Here is a 1860s era photo showing a structure with weathered paint like I did on my model.




I'm only getting picky because you're up to the challenge!  But, that period weathering is a lot more like the "washing away" look than the peeling paint you modeled.  Notice how the paint is fading away on the bottoms of the boards but when tucked under the overhang of the board above, is holding its white color better.  I think you could take your existing paint and sand it lightly to get the same effect.  The sand paper would hit the exposed lower edges and leave paint in the crevices.  More even than the splotchiness of a peeling paint effect.