Author Topic: freshly painted look  (Read 1124 times)

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SOUPAC

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freshly painted look
« on: November 22, 2007, 01:53:07 AM »
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Certainly most locomotives lose all their shine in pretty short order, but I saw a photo by Preston Cook (Rob Sarberenyi collection) the other day that made we wonder if anyone had successfully achieved realistic looking results in a model. Rob's photo of all things, was of a Southern Pacific tunnel motor coming straight off the assembly line. Gleaming in bright sunlight with a bit of snow on the ground, the sides of the fuel tanks were almost a perfect mirror, and certain portions of the sides looked the same way.

I would think this would be difficult to obtain and I was just wondering if anyone had tried.  I think glosscoat would be a bit too much and lack any control. Maybe an airbrush? I also suspect the "ripple" look of the hood panels would be virtually impossible.

Any ideas?


« Last Edit: November 22, 2007, 02:01:13 AM by SOUPAC »
RICK

tom mann

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Re: freshly painted look
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2007, 07:44:07 AM »
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I'm about to do this on a tank car, and I think I'm going to spray Future with an airbrush.

SOUPAC

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Re: freshly painted look
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2007, 12:29:07 PM »
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I'm about to do this on a tank car, and I think I'm going to spray Future with an airbrush.

Do you think a "spotty" application of varied coverage would be proper to indicate various ages of the paint?

Any thoughts on creating the wavy metal panel look?
RICK