Author Topic: What is this?  (Read 1379 times)

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daniel_leavitt2000

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What is this?
« on: December 21, 2022, 10:27:05 PM »
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I'm researching the offset Russell Plow and came across this picture:
https://live.staticflickr.com/7017/6567220701_af15e7070c_k.jpg

Clearly this is the front truck of most Russell plows, but what on earth is it? Was this a purpose-built truck specifically for the front of a low production MoW equipment? Was it used anywhere else?
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peteski

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2022, 10:30:08 PM »
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Cool find!
Sure looks like that is what it is.  It is not cast steel,  but made from welded sheet steel.
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nkalanaga

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2022, 11:58:04 PM »
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A lot of snowplows had trucks without springs in the front, to keep the plow from hitting the rails if the car "bounced" on rough track.  That looks like something home-made, which is entirely possible, as many snowplows were.
N Kalanaga
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wcfn100

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2022, 12:34:58 AM »
+1

Clearly this is the front truck of most Russell plows, but what on earth is it? Was this a purpose-built truck specifically for the front of a low production MoW equipment? Was it used anywhere else?

I'm not sure you can say that is the front truck of most Russell plows.  What I've found in past research as a truck like this:

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Jason

sd45elect2000

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2022, 05:37:05 AM »
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I’ve seen both. Look, no brakes.


SirTainly

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2022, 05:48:34 AM »
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Also looks to have a shorter wheel spacing that the rear truck, interesting find

sd45elect2000

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2022, 06:07:41 AM »
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I’m pretty sure the writing on the cast truck says Russell Snowplow company. The Milwaukee plow is all welded with fabricated trucks. Older plows are rivited with cast trucks. The wheel base from truck to truck is different. The front trucks have no common parts with the rear truck.

Randy

Lemosteam

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2022, 06:15:30 AM »
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What I find interesting are the stabilizer links from the truck to the frame of the plow.  I'm sure they are isolated with rubber pucks, but how did that handle track radii through yard switches, etc.?

mecgp7

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2022, 08:11:59 AM »
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If I had to gander, I would think the design includes "stabilizers" (those things attached to the frame down to the trucks). This would force the blade to follow the same path as the trucks vertically rather than free float as a normal car and truck do. No springs would further keep the plow steady. I would think it would be done purposely for switches in yards as a plow rocking back and forth could catch and cause damage. The speed would be much slower in the yard so vertical motion or flexibility would not be necessary as it would out on the mainline, etc. 
Actual Russell snowplow diagrams show the front trucks much shorter in length than the rear. This would also help the plow to follow the ups and downs of the rails this keeping the blade at a more consistent height above the rail height.
Complete conjecture on my part.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2022, 08:23:56 AM by mecgp7 »

Lemosteam

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2022, 09:30:52 AM »
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If I had to gander, I would think the design includes "stabilizers" (those things attached to the frame down to the trucks). This would force the blade to follow the same path as the trucks vertically rather than free float as a normal car and truck do. No springs would further keep the plow steady. I would think it would be done purposely for switches in yards as a plow rocking back and forth could catch and cause damage. The speed would be much slower in the yard so vertical motion or flexibility would not be necessary as it would out on the mainline, etc. 
Actual Russell snowplow diagrams show the front trucks much shorter in length than the rear. This would also help the plow to follow the ups and downs of the rails this keeping the blade at a more consistent height above the rail height.
Complete conjecture on my part.

Makes sense, but I was thinking more of the rotation of the truck twisting the links as it pivots on the bolster pin.  I.e. the top of the link is fixed and as the truck rotates in the plan view, the lower portion of the link would rotate fore and aft depending on which way the truck is swinging.

brokemoto

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2022, 10:21:52 AM »
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The front truck on the CMStP&P looks like a cross between an Andrews and a roller bearing frame, although clearly the truck is friction bearing.

The second looks like a scrunched and modified Andrews.

wcfn100

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2022, 10:43:33 AM »
+2
I’ve seen both. Look, no brakes.

Russell advertised the front truck to have one brake, outside hung.

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Jason

daniel_leavitt2000

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #12 on: December 22, 2022, 03:53:35 PM »
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Russell advertised the front truck to have one brake, outside hung.

(Attachment Link)

Jason

Thanks Jason, that answers another question I had. The MILW plow looks like it has 28" wheels on the front where the cast trucks have 33".

Anyone know the wheel base of the cast truck? This has been an annoyance on the Atlas/Walthers cars for me.
There's a shyness found in reason
Apprehensive influence swallow away
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Then you're careful grace for sure
Kinda like the way you're breathing
Kinda like the way you keep looking away

wcfn100

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #13 on: December 22, 2022, 04:39:13 PM »
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Anyone know the wheel base of the cast truck? This has been an annoyance on the Atlas/Walthers cars for me.

It's in the picture I posted,  4'3" on the front truck and 5'6" on the rear.

Jason

daniel_leavitt2000

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Re: What is this?
« Reply #14 on: December 22, 2022, 04:47:40 PM »
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It's in the picture I posted,  4'3" on the front truck and 5'6" on the rear.

Jason

I really should read what I respond to.  :facepalm:
There's a shyness found in reason
Apprehensive influence swallow away
You seem to feel abysmal take it
Then you're careful grace for sure
Kinda like the way you're breathing
Kinda like the way you keep looking away