Author Topic: Steam Loco Weathering  (Read 660 times)

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mike_lawyer

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Steam Loco Weathering
« on: June 08, 2021, 10:49:34 PM »
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Question - I am doing some weathering of drivers using an airbrush while the loco is under power.  After I am finished, do you wipe off the paint from the driver wheel treads, or just let that come off during running the engine a bit on the layout?

Dave V

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2021, 11:00:34 PM »
+2
If you've got paint on the treads, it's not going to run anyway.  Even if it did, you'd likely leave a residue of dried paint on the railhead.

Others my disagree, but I always make a deliberate effort to remove any paint (or clear flat finish for that matter) from every wheel tread before placing the engine back in service.
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mike_lawyer

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2021, 11:19:15 PM »
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Do you just use a q-tip with some thinner to clean off the driver threads?

Dave V

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2021, 11:27:14 PM »
+1
Do you just use a q-tip with some thinner to clean off the driver threads?

No, I never use Q-tips because they can throw fibers that get caught in stuff.  I use "micro applicators" that I get in bulk from Amazon:



https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JYXRBZ5/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

But yes, put some thinner on them and be careful!

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mmagliaro

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2021, 12:44:44 AM »
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I have done weathering that way (airbrush with the engine running).  It was over 10 years ago, but I think I cut thin strips of masking tape and carefully wrapped the driver treads with them before painting to minimize how much cleaning I would have to do.  Even so, I did not do this on the pilot wheels or tender truck wheels.  As I recall, I just used a fine brush and thinner to clean all he wheels after.
I also put little drops of oil on crankpins and the valve slide, and any other obvious moving parts, just to make sure no paint would stick in those joints.

peteski

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2021, 01:01:58 AM »
+2


Here is a setup I made for cleaning wheels (loco and rolling stock).  If I was trying to clean paint off the wheel treads I would moisten the paper towel with some lacquer thinner and let the wheels run (and slip) over the paper towel.  But the lcoo would likely have to be powered using couple of test leads, not through the track. Unless of course the tender had full electrical pickup, then it could pick up track power (from beyond the paper towel).
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GlennS

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2021, 01:45:01 PM »
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Here is a setup I made for cleaning wheels (loco and rolling stock).  If I was trying to clean paint off the wheel treads I would moisten the paper towel with some lacquer thinner and let the wheels run (and slip) over the paper towel.  But the lcoo would likely have to be powered using couple of test leads, not through the track. Unless of course the tender had full electrical pickup, then it could pick up track power (from beyond the paper towel).

This looks like a great method to use.

However a paper towel with lacquer thinner (even alcohol) is a potential fire hazard, all it needs is a source of ignition (spark from locomotive) and you've got a fire.  I suggest planning ahead and have a fire extinguisher on hand, or at least a damp towel/rag to smother it with.  Why chance it, it only takes a few minutes to wet a rag.

Be safe,

tom mann

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2021, 08:04:41 PM »
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When I did stuff like this I would have a little test track that I would run the loco around after weathering.  If you're careful when you apply paint, the treads would be mostly clean right after weathering, but the loco would take a little bit of pushing to get going. But even without any solvent, the treads would get clean after a few minutes.

bbunge

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2021, 01:26:19 PM »
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Here is a setup I made for cleaning wheels (loco and rolling stock).  If I was trying to clean paint off the wheel treads I would moisten the paper towel with some lacquer thinner and let the wheels run (and slip) over the paper towel.  But the lcoo would likely have to be powered using couple of test leads, not through the track. Unless of course the tender had full electrical pickup, then it could pick up track power (from beyond the paper towel).

I've used coffee filter material with good success for this sort of wheel cleaner.  A more rough surface, doesn't like to tear and less fibers to get where they should not be. 

Bob

peteski

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Re: Steam Loco Weathering
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2021, 03:09:28 PM »
+2
I've used coffee filter material with good success for this sort of wheel cleaner.  A more rough surface, doesn't like to tear and less fibers to get where they should not be. 

Bob

I'm sure that works ok too, but I specifically selected Bounty paper towels for their thickenss and "fluff factor".  Neither the railhead, nor the wheel tread are flat.  Railhead is rounded, while treads are slightly conical.  Filter material is thin and flat. As I see it, there would only be small area of the tread that it would be cleaning.  Thicker and softer paper towel (like a sponge) will come in contact with larger area of the tread (not just at the contact point of the tread with rail. Bounty is rather strong - I  never had a problem with it tearing.
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