Author Topic: Open source 3D Scanner  (Read 464 times)

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rodsup9000

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Open source 3D Scanner
« on: November 23, 2018, 02:30:04 AM »
+1
  I made a comment in the "Anycubic Photon" thread about 3D scanners and after doing some research, I've put a plan together to build 2 of them. I've found this https://www.lulzbot.com/support/ciclop-3d-scanner-kit-bq. It says a resolution of .5mm, so will have to see how correct that is. I think size wise, it'll do what I want. I have everything in house to build this but the "ZUM SCAN" shield for the Arduino Uno, cameras and the threaded rod. I ordered a 2 shields

 https://www.ebay.com/itm/ZUM-Scan-Expansion-Board-Replacement-Parts-For-Ciclop-3D-DIY-Scanner-Kit/112230023446?epid=2099158063&hash=item1a216e4116:g:7kkAAOSwa~BYSOuJ:rk:2:pf:0

 And will pickup the threaded rod tomorrow. I do have 2 different cameras (one is a logitech, but don't know the model) that I'll try to see if they work before buying new ones. So unless I have to buy new cameras, I'll be spending less than $35 right now to have 2 scanners.

 Downloaded the STL's for the printed parts and will start printing both sets tomorrow on the big FDM printer that I have still set up. Then as soon as the shields get here, I hope to have everything else done.


 I think once they are built, the hardest part will be learning how to use it. There are a few videos that will help with some of the software, so that will help. If this works, who know where I'll end up going with the printing.



 I've found easier to understand instruction on instructables on how to build it.



https://www.instructables.com/id/Ciclop-3D-Scanner-BQ-Horus/

 Going through my lasers and I only have one that has the line, so I ordered 4 new ones today.
Also the bearings I'm using are not the ones in the build sheet, so I'm going to have to draw up a new table for the rotating bed.
 
 

 
   
« Last Edit: November 23, 2018, 08:51:06 PM by rodsup9000 »
Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
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wcfn100

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2018, 10:58:59 AM »
0
It says a resolution of .05mm, so will have to see how correct that is.

The page says .5mm.

Jason

rodsup9000

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2018, 11:02:34 AM »
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The page says .5mm.

Jason

 You're right, Jason I missed typed and I changed it.
Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
http://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=31585.0

Lemosteam

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2018, 12:11:58 PM »
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@rodsup9000 I have walls in my designs less than that resolution.   

Be careful, if you try to scan a part, and attempt to reduce it's scale that 0.5mm error can become smaller and smaller and the CAD software might choke on the conversion because it cannot deal with that surface correction.

Also it will not be able to distinguish between a chamfered or filleted edge and assume it is square.

peteski

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2018, 01:14:28 PM »
+1
@rodsup9000 I have walls in my designs less than that resolution.   

Be careful, if you try to scan a part, and attempt to reduce it's scale that 0.5mm error can become smaller and smaller and the CAD software might choke on the conversion because it cannot deal with that surface correction.

Also it will not be able to distinguish between a chamfered or filleted edge and assume it is square.

I wish you would re-post that lengthy explanation of why 3D scanners are not a magic-solution for a source of 3D designs. Especially the part where you state that it will likely take longer time to clean up a 3D scan to make it printable than it would take to draw the item from scratch.

But then again, sometimes we do not need to produce precise objects with accurate dimensions - close-enough might be good-enough. Especially if it comes to scanning complex-surface objects like human figures.

It will still be interesting to see what develops here.
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Lemosteam

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2018, 01:35:25 PM »
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@peteski, I can't remember that one and I think my image is gone now.

Simple, scanners are imperfect and can leave gaps, and the gaps must be closed to create a solid or even a completely meshed surface.

Trust me trying to find, and much more close, an open 0.001" sliver gap is a PITA.

It takes less time to model a part than it does to scan and correct a model to make it usable for printing.


peteski

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rodsup9000

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2018, 03:48:57 AM »
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 John (@Lemostream), I understand what you and others a saying about the resolution and some areas not scanning all the edges of the original part. When I first got into 3D printing 6 or 7 years ago, I didn't know any CAD at all. After I built my first FDM printer, I would find stuff on the net to print and a lot of them at that time had a lot of holes in them. As you know, the file for printing must be water tight, so that is when I learned to use places like Netfabb to fix the files. Then when I found a file that I want to change something about it, I learned how to import it into meshmixer (I think that what is was) and the change it into what I wanted. So I have the experience to manipulate files and then make them watertight.

 So my idea with the scanner, and I don't know for sure if it will work, will be scan the item, then import it into a mesh program and make it solid. Then I can go in and change what I want and fix anything that needs fixing. In the end, if the scanner can't help me, then I'm not out a lot of money. And if it's something that works some, then I'll look into upgrading to a better one.

 Anyways, I was getting ready to start printing parts today, and the plate glass I have on the bed broke. It has been cracked for a few months and I keep forgetting to get a replacement. So I'll have to wait till Monday to get the glass and then I can start the ptinting of the parts.
Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
http://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=31585.0

Iain

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Re: Open source 3D Scanner
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2018, 12:03:21 AM »
0
  I made a comment in the "Anycubic Photon" thread about 3D scanners and after doing some research, I've put a plan together to build 2 of them. I've found this https://www.lulzbot.com/support/ciclop-3d-scanner-kit-bq. It says a resolution of .5mm, so will have to see how correct that is. I think size wise, it'll do what I want. I have everything in house to build this but the "ZUM SCAN" shield for the Arduino Uno, cameras and the threaded rod. I ordered a 2 shields

 

Ah, that thing.  My sister was involved in the early development when she worked for lulzbot.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com