Author Topic: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering  (Read 1212 times)

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CodyO

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CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« on: September 04, 2016, 05:24:29 PM »
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Well guys I started trying to weather the buildings on my switching layout. Hoping you guys could offer me some advice on how good/horrible I did.

My technique was to wet it down and then do a concrete color then repeat 2-3 times with black. In my mind it passes the 3 foot rule buy fails some of the close up views.
Modeling the Pennsylvania Middle Division in late 1954
             Nothing Will Stop The US Air Force

Missaberoad

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Re: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2016, 05:32:20 PM »
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What kind of paint are you using for the black?
Ryan in Alberta

CodyO

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Re: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2016, 05:49:03 PM »
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Grimy black acrylic.
Modeling the Pennsylvania Middle Division in late 1954
             Nothing Will Stop The US Air Force

Missaberoad

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Re: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2016, 06:10:48 PM »
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Ah... I would try on a unseen area to test that it wont ruin the finish first but you can use a wet brush (with 70% alcohol) to clean up the black wash. Dry it on a paper towel and work the paint till it starts moving again.
It can help fine tune some of the areas that have a water stained look still.

All in all it looks good tho :)
Ryan in Alberta

chicken45

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Re: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2016, 09:45:03 PM »
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Ah... I would try on a unseen area to test that it wont ruin the finish first but you can use a wet brush (with 70% alcohol) to clean up the black wash. Dry it on a paper towel and work the paint till it starts moving again.
It can help fine tune some of the areas that have a water stained look still.

All in all it looks good tho :)

So, I was actually thinking about this for a few weeks as Cody showed me these pics a while ago.  I do think they need cleaned up a bit, but...Ed's Law manifested itself in the form of an old fire station near my son's school. It looks like nature puddled a wash on the concrete.
Josh Surkosky

Here's a Clerihew about Ed. K.

Ed Kapucinski
Every night, he plants a new tree.
But mention his law
and you've pulled your last straw!

Alternate version:
Ed Kapucinski
Every night, he plants a new tree.
He asks excitedly "Did you say Ménage à Trois?"
No, I said "Ed's Law."

robert3985

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Re: CodyO's Adventures in Weathering
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2016, 08:06:01 AM »
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Well guys I started trying to weather the buildings on my switching layout. Hoping you guys could offer me some advice on how good/horrible I did.

My technique was to wet it down and then do a concrete color then repeat 2-3 times with black. In my mind it passes the 3 foot rule buy fails some of the close up views.

Only "rule" I know of is the rule that if you're happy with it, then it's okay.

Oddly, if models pass the "close-up" test, the most harsh critic being your camera and getting close to your model, then it almost always passes the spurious "3-foot-rule"...which is something made up by modelers not interested in detail work to justify their lack of interest.

Seeing as how you've repeated some steps in your process 2-3 times, I'd say you're probably interested in details...so just forget about the "3-foot-excuse" and continue on improving your modeling skills.

As to your building facade...looks like the main culprit is not keeping the surface damp enough for the black application to run to the edges, so it stops sharply where the surface has dried.  An easy way to blend these is to take your concrete color, or a slightly lighter concrete color, and carefully drybrush those structures on your building that are supposed to be "concrete".  Depending on how much drybrushing you do, you can easily blend any sharply delineated color edges away, plus, drybrushing also highlights raised details, which naturally (in nature) get lighter.  Washes emphasize cracks, corners, nooks and crannies...drybrushing emphasizes raised details.  Using them both usually will give you the best results.

As always, I encourage modelers to look at the real things or things that are similar and use those as references when weathering, or building scenery.  Beginners usually apply too much, and too general weathering on models.  The vast majority of prototype stuff is subtly weathered, with exceptions of course...especially buildings whose surfaces take years to change, and sit in one place and one environment. Also, contrasting weathering applied to the same model, such as water calcification or discoloration at gutters, roof angles, rust stains running down from warehouse door hinges and latches, rusty scratches on metal doors or a line of discoloration around a barn or home from muddy water splashing up in rainy environments.  Don't forget pigeon poop, which is all over urban roofs, gutters and other things high up.  These weathering details are not as subtle (or not subtle at all) compared to the overall weathering of the structure.  This "sharpness vs softness" is very pleasing to the human eye, and observers always pick out these small, sharp weathering touches.  Remember to observe reality closely to replicate it on your models.

Anyway, your efforts on this model are pretty good...just get rid of the sharp color delineations on the smooth surfaces and it'll look exponentially more realistic.

Cheerio!
Bob Gilmore