Author Topic: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house  (Read 1828 times)

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Mark W

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Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« on: September 09, 2014, 08:53:07 PM »
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Began a new project scratchbuilding a freight transfer.







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Mark W

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2014, 01:20:16 AM »
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Finished up the main structure tonight.  Anyone know a good easy way to scratch build windows?  I'll probably 3D print some, but that takes so long and I'm too impatient and want something to put in soon.





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CoalPorter

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2014, 09:48:42 PM »
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Okay , but some things bug me. What is the point of the second story penthouse? Kind of expensive, unless you don't have the lot size out side?

Why are the truck doors lower sill located higher than the train doors? Do you understand that finished floor is normally flat and level ? Are the forklifts going to drive up small ramps? It just doesn't have any logic ?

Usually docks have more truck doors spaced just enough for the trailers to fit, what are the windows between the
doors for ?

The mandoor on the skewed wall will require interior stairs, which happens allot, just be aware of this.

For truck doors, use corrugated styrene. For windows, I glue on plastic first and then install custom cut muttons and
mullions on at a time, unless you preplanded for windows from Grandt Line or another manuf.

Cool otherwise, and im sure you designed it for a specific spot on your layout. :)

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peteski

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2014, 11:17:25 PM »
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Okay , but some things bug me. What is the point of the second story penthouse? Kind of expensive, unless you don't have the lot size out side?

Why are the truck doors lower sill located higher than the train doors? Do you understand that finished floor is normally flat and level ? Are the forklifts going to drive up small ramps? It just doesn't have any logic ?

Usually docks have more truck doors spaced just enough for the trailers to fit, what are the windows between the
doors for ?

The mandoor on the skewed wall will require interior stairs, which happens allot, just be aware of this.

For truck doors, use corrugated styrene. For windows, I glue on plastic first and then install custom cut muttons and
mullions on at a time, unless you preplanded for windows from Grandt Line or another manuf.

Cool otherwise, and im sure you designed it for a specific spot on your layout. :)

Geez, you have to spoil all the fun by applying logic!  :|

But seriously, to me these sound like excellent observations to be considered while scratchbuilding structures like that.  I learned something here.

As far as windows go, building them mullion and mutton at a time will be quite a chore. Personally I would go with one of the many available window moldings.
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Mark W

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2014, 11:47:18 PM »
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Okay , but some things bug me. What is the point of the second story penthouse? Kind of expensive, unless you don't have the lot size out side?
I also never thought to think about these things.  Though I'm sure it's not too uncommon for general offices/restrooms to be up here to keep floor space below open for freight.  Or perhaps a sort of clearstory?


Why are the truck doors lower sill located higher than the train doors? Do you understand that finished floor is normally flat and level ? Are the forklifts going to drive up small ramps? It just doesn't have any logic ?
Those are larger windows, not truck doors. ;)  Freight doors are only on the two opposite (long) sides. 


Usually docks have more truck doors spaced just enough for the trailers to fit, what are the windows between the
doors for ?
Again, those are windows.   The smaller windows between the doors *shrugs* why not? 


The mandoor on the skewed wall will require interior stairs, which happens allot, just be aware of this.
Never thought about that. 


For truck doors, use corrugated styrene. For windows, I glue on plastic first and then install custom cut muttons and
mullions on at a time, unless you preplanded for windows from Grandt Line or another manuf.

Cool otherwise, and im sure you designed it for a specific spot on your layout. :)

Buliding them one by one doesn't sound appealing.  I didn't plan for Grandt Line, however would be able to 3D print my own easily (will likely do this eventually).
I heard elsewhere about just printing window frames on transparency paper.  Has anyone done this before?  Results?

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peteski

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2014, 01:56:27 AM »
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I heard elsewhere about just printing window frames on transparency paper.  Has anyone done this before?  Results?

You can print them on transparency. Best to use a laser printer. But only black will really show up. Other colors will be transparent (they need a white background to show the true color).  But black muntins will not show up well against the dark interior.  Alps printers can print white and metallic inks which would show up much better.  But IMO you would still need to frame the edges of the opening with some styrene to look like windows.
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sirenwerks

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2014, 06:47:46 AM »
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I heard elsewhere about just printing window frames on transparency paper.  Has anyone done this before?  Results?


Consider Dave Schneider's craft cutter window process - https://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=23354.0   I think it starts around the 14th or 15th page, and it does require a craft cutter, or access to one.
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Mark W

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2014, 10:53:59 PM »
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...it does require a craft cutter, or access to one.

Wha... WHAT IS THIS MAGIC!?!?!? 

So I skimmed the thread, saw these things on sale at Michaels, went ahead and picked one up, and my mind is blown!  Why/how have I not heard of this until now!?

Oh the possibilities!!!


Window frames are cutting now.  Will post pics soon. 

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2014, 12:52:14 AM »
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I'm going to invoke the 3 foot rule for the first batch as I learn the ropes.  All I had was .020 styrene which the cutter can't quite cut through, but comes awful close.
.015 or .010 would be perfect for the next batch.  After just a few hours, I can definitely say this is a machine that every scratchbuilder needs!!



Without the cutter, I would have spent probably 3 days, focusing and cutting horribly sloppy frames.  These were cut and punched out within a few hours, while multi-tasking other projects. 

« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 01:09:24 AM by Mark W »
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peteski

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2014, 02:03:33 AM »
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Mark, I hate to rain on your parade, but this is TRW.  To me the muntins look way out of scale. They look like something out of Bachmann Plasticville.  Muntins in industrial windows are usually made from thin metal T shapes.  The windows to me also lack the perimeter framing. Probably an inch in width.

Here is an example of how I envision this type of a window.




But it is your scratchbuilt model - you do whatever you want.

« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 02:05:28 AM by peteski »
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160pennsy

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2014, 05:36:31 AM »
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Consider Dave Schneider's craft cutter window process - https://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=23354.0   I think it starts around the 14th or 15th page, and it does require a craft cutter, or access to one.


Mark,

The photo below shows Dave's method of using colored vinyl, stuck onto clear styrene, windows trimmed out using the Silhouette cutter, and then removing the individual chads to reveal the wndow glazing underneath. IMHO...the mullions or muntins on these windows look much more to scale than your first attempt using .020 styrene with the craft cutter. Another big plus with this process - you already have the clear glazing on the window all in one shot! With your white .020 styrene windows you'd still have to go back and add the glazing behind them.

« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 05:46:46 AM by 160pennsy »
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Mark W

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2014, 12:23:56 PM »
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Mark, I hate to rain on your parade, but this is TRW.  To me the muntins look way out of scale.

That's why I post here.  "atta'boy's" on Facebook/elsewhere are great, but real critiques you get on TRW are what I want. 

As I said, invoking the 3 foot rule on the first run, (or more like 30 foot rule in this case).  I'm going to pick up some ultra thin styrene tonight and try the other methods suggested as well to get the better look.   
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jimmo

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2014, 02:04:22 PM »
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That's why I post here.  "atta'boy's" on Facebook/elsewhere are great, but real critiques you get on TRW are what I want. 

As I said, invoking the 3 foot rule on the first run, (or more like 30 foot rule in this case).  I'm going to pick up some ultra thin styrene tonight and try the other methods suggested as well to get the better look.

Now that's a great attitude Mark! This is what a hobby forum is supposed to be.

My question has to do with the thickness of the walls. Are you going to add any depth to the openings or just model them as if they were only inset a couple of inches? The wall thickness will be crucial at the tops of the walls. How are you planning to deal with that?
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sirenwerks

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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2014, 02:43:37 PM »
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My question has to do with the thickness of the walls. Are you going to add any depth to the openings or just model them as if they were only inset a couple of inches? The wall thickness will be crucial at the tops of the walls. How are you planning to deal with that?

What Jimmo asked.  You can go either way.  As Peteski's posted pic shows, window surface that is relatively flush with the brick face works but if you're going to set them back (and I consider what you did on the first try set back) you may want to include a concrete sill on the bottom, and maybe even a lintel on top.
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Re: Scratchbuilding a freight transfer house
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2014, 03:29:07 PM »
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On the left, the original.  Measured and cut by hand and assembled over about 4 or 5 days.
On the right, the craft cutter sequel.  Drawn in cad, cut hands-free, and assembled all this morning. 






In the second photo, you can see two experiments with the windows.  Instead of cutting out the frames, I just scored clear styrene.  On the bottom you can see I sloppily filled in the scores with a marker (wide tipped).  I think if I get a thin tip, this will be the way to go.   With the craft cutters precise window cut outs on the right, I may be able to cut the windows and achieve flush setting. 


Regarding the roof wall thickness, I had been debating whether to dress it or leave it.  Now, I don't think I have any excuse, so will have to dress it up. 

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