Author Topic: ME 80' bridge question  (Read 895 times)

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packers#1

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ME 80' bridge question
« on: April 27, 2014, 06:29:46 PM »
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Could I use the ME 80' bridge span sections to model this bridge over Lake Hartwell/Seneca River in Clemson, SC, in N scale? I'm pretty sure I could, but if there's something closer in N scale, I'd love to know about it.
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Sawyer Berry
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jimmo

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2014, 06:37:18 PM »
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The prototype bridge appears to be made up of 80' or 100' spans so IMHO using ME 80' spans would be perfect. A little selective compression (especially on a project like this) is not a bad thing.
James R. Will

cv_acr

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2014, 10:10:37 AM »
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And whether the length of each span matches exactly, those spans look exactly like the ME girders.

jimmo

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2014, 11:36:53 AM »
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And whether the length of each span matches exactly, those spans look exactly like the ME girders.

+1

I say "go for it!" I don't know of any other bridge spans 80' or larger available in N-scale. ME makes great bridge spans.
James R. Will

packers#1

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2014, 01:44:41 PM »
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Awesome; this is an in the future project but I was curious; I want to try to hit the full length of the bridge for a future layout which is still in my head, but it could end up being too big, so if it gets selectively compressed, I'll probably still go for 6 spans. what's really neat is the abutments are double track, but they ripped the double track out a while back.

I'm not sure if the spans are all the same length but to my eye they are (whenever I go to church or up to the campus beach I cross another bridge that has a far-off view of this bridge). Thanks for the encouragement fellas!
Sawyer Berry
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jimmo

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2014, 05:10:22 PM »
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Most of the time you can tell if a span is longer or shorter in length (if your view is not very defining) by looking to see if the span is taller or shorter in the vertical. Taller means it will be longer and shorter in height will mean it's shorter in length. Bridge spans are calculated to fit the given space, not just made longer or shorter.

Cutting down or lengthening true-to-scale bridge spans is dicey. I've seen many a model bridge where the laws of physics were stretched into an alternate reality.
James R. Will

milw156

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2014, 07:42:24 PM »
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The ME 80' spans have 17 vertical stiffeners equally spaced except for the ends, the proto has one more(?) but the ends are not spaced the same distance apart. I think you should have no trouble using the ME spans for this project.  Even if the ME spans are a little shorter or longer, I don't think anyone will be able to tell unless you tell them! Consider using their HO bridge feet to get the height from the top of the pier to the bottom of the span.
Rick

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2014, 07:57:05 PM »
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Most of the time you can tell if a span is longer or shorter in length (if your view is not very defining) by looking to see if the span is taller or shorter in the vertical. Taller means it will be longer and shorter in height will mean it's shorter in length. Bridge spans are calculated to fit the given space, not just made longer or shorter.

"Most of the time" is the operative phrase here.  Pacific Great Eastern's curved side-hill bridge in the Cheakamus Canyon 18.1 miles North of Squamish, BC, was 470 feet long comprised of 6 deck plate girders - 2 each of 60' & 80' plus one 90' and one 100'.  It was built to a Cooper E50 rating and all six spans were the same depth - the depth that would normally be used for a 100' span.  The construction advantage was that none of the five piers had to have stepped top surfaces.  750 feet South of this bridge was another one with two deck plate girder spans - an 80' and a 40' - and those did have different depths.  To truly stay on topic for this thread, the ME bridges would be very nearly perfect for this latter bridge.

Cheers,

primavw

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Re: ME 80' bridge question
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2014, 12:18:50 AM »
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I myself have built two ME open deck girders like the ones above and I love them. great little kits and easy on the wallet.
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