Author Topic: Q for the 3D design folks  (Read 1879 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

kalbert

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 459
  • Respect: 0
Q for the 3D design folks
« on: February 06, 2014, 10:40:40 PM »
0
I've reached the limit of what Sketchup can do for me. It worked great for drawing some buildings from full size plans and was ok for doing the air filter project. Now I'm wanting to try and tackle a GP10 number boards/wind shield to graft onto a high nose cab and have reached a snag. Sketchup doesn't do tiny things very well, it's for big things. I cannot get the minimum segment length small enough to do fine round details, like headlight holes and radiused windows and number board openings. Looking for something that can do that, and of course, looking for something that can do that near free. I've tried AutoCad 123D, seems like it maybe will do that but it is pretty simple and I'm spoiled by some of the more advanced features of Sketchup. Maybe I just need to spend more time with it. What are other people using?

cnw mike

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 73
  • Respect: 0
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2014, 10:46:12 PM »
0
Solidworks is the best. I have to use Pro-E (Creo) at work and I much prefer Solidworks.

cnw mike

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 73
  • Respect: 0
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2014, 10:47:25 PM »
0
IMO of course...

I've about given up on shapeways though. It seems if you aren't designing gaudy jewelry or iPhone cases they aren't interested.

Shipsure

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1487
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +609
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2014, 11:29:49 PM »
0
There's good old fashion MK 1 Scratch building that works as good or better than RP  :D  Been doing it for 35 years now and I know folks like Roy Sutherland of Barracuda studios and others that work circles around any 3d print you'll get from current technology,by hand.  Back in the stone age we used to photo etch small details and apply them to forms for really detailed stuff.  old school.  Don't get me wrong, i see some of the stuff being done and it's freaking amazing, but the surface texture becomes an issue even with machines doing 25 micron layers.  Gosh i sound like my dad growling..."back in our day we fixed our own cars"   :D  Not trying to put down the technology or those who are pushing way beyond it's capabilities, i do that every day at MTL, but I see people working so hard to get parts that don't reflect the effort put into producing them...and the frustration.  I remember my first big gig as a Model Maker and being walked away from a milling machine and sat down in front of a sander to square up some parts.  I learned quickly that the most expensive machine in the building wasn't always the one you should be using.    just thinkin' 

Joe

kalbert

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 459
  • Respect: 0
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2014, 11:37:04 PM »
0
Ufda... I looked at Solidworks just now, yikes. Anytime software companies want me to "Get a Quote" or "Contact Sales" to just to get an idea of the range of pricing options I get scared and run away. It says to me that their pricing model is either a) too complicated or b) too rich for my blood.

How do you mean Shapeways isn't interested? They don't really control what products are available. How the hell do they know if the air filters I did were model parts and not jewelry (other than I called them air filters, I could have just as easily called them earrings). Is there another service like this that would be more suitable for getting stuff printed?

Thanks, but no thanks on the scratch building kit bashing route. Yea I could call the Atlas parts department and order some stuff and hack it all together, been there, done that, it was fun. Kinda wanted to try something new. Not sure if what I want to do would even be possible yet, but if I (or someone) doesn't try it and fail, how the hell will any one know what the limits are or if they've been pushed farther? I may very well end up hacking up some old fashioned injection molded parts, but if I do it won't be for lack of trying to print first.

Not really looking for a debate on the merits of printing vs scratching, just curious what any of the people who are working with this stuff are using. HuskerN are you listening?  :D
« Last Edit: February 06, 2014, 11:41:40 PM by kalbert »

packers#1

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1068
  • Gender: Male
  • Modern Shortline Modeler
  • Respect: +27
    • Unnamed Switching Layout
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2014, 11:42:02 PM »
0
My University has a class for Solidworks (my poor ME friends have to take that class right now; it's a junior course for me); it's heavy industry grade stuff as far as I know; you might could try looking into a more advanced version of Autocad, or if the 123D version you tried has the finer abilities you're looking for, it may be worth pursuing that a bit further.
Sawyer Berry
Clemson University graduate, c/o 2018

bnsfdash8

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 466
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +378
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2014, 11:44:10 PM »
0
I use Inventor and Solidworks for my models. I prefer Inventor but Solidworks is a close second. I use Inventor where I work and the college I attend has Solidworks so I'm pretty lucky in that respect.

I have had nothing but success with Shapeways. Yes the print quality isn't injection molding quality but it's better than nothing, and at a reasonable cost. I have quite a few models up on Shapeways including various cabs for NS.

Reese
Modeling Norfolk Southern one loco at a time.

wcfn100

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 7700
  • Oh, it's an Owl!
  • Respect: +521
    • Chicago Great Western Modeler
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2014, 11:50:18 PM »
0
Many of these types of programs have excellent deals for students.  If you know someone with a current student ID, you may want to look into it.

Jason

PiperguyUMD

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 248
  • Respect: +123
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2014, 12:18:52 AM »
0
Are you working in N scale of full scale?  It is true that Sketchup has it's limitations, but I've had the best success working in full scale.  When I'm finished, I make the entire model a component and then rescale it to N scale.  Hope that helps!

reinhardtjh

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1794
  • Respect: +116
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2014, 01:17:29 AM »
0
I'm playing with 3D using ViaCAD Pro V8 (and before that ViaCAD 2D/3D).  It's relatively cheap and it works on both the Mac and Windows platform. 

They just released V9 and ViaCAD 2D/3D lists for $99.99 but if you're on the mailing list they have coupon codes fairly often.  http://www.punchcad.com/p-27-viacad-2d3d-v9.aspx and there is a trial download available http://www.punchcad.com/trial.aspx

I'm not experienced enough to say if it's a good or bad product, I haven't gotten far enough to attempt a Shapeways print yet.
John H. Reinhardt
PRRT&HS #8909
C&O HS #11530
N-Trak #7566

robert3985

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 2120
  • Respect: +407
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2014, 01:38:11 AM »
0
Here's the trick with Sketchup.  Draw your initial model at 100%....life sized...factor in what your minimums and maximums are for the Shapeways print...like rivets that are twice as big as "real" rivets, just so they'll show up on your print or comply with Shapeways design parameters, then reduce the drawing 1/160th after you're finished.  The small details that you can't do if you draw at your part's actual size will reduce accordingly...at least they do for me!

randgust

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1542
  • Respect: +680
    • Randgust N Scale Kits
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2014, 06:59:25 AM »
0
Yeah, that's what I'm doing and I'll freely admit I don't know what I'm doing, just following advice; drawing stuff to full size in sketchup and not doing the scaling until I hit netfabb.

I got the tiny little doorknob to render and print out on the phone booth, had to make it a hair bigger, but the second time it worked.

pjm20

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 848
  • Gender: Male
  • Modeling the mighty PRR!
  • Respect: +14
    • My Youtube Channel
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2014, 07:25:37 AM »
0
I have used AutoCAD and Inventor and they are both great 3D modeling programs, but they are quite different from each other.
PRRT&HS #8862
Modeling the PRR in N Scale
16mm Live Steam Enthusiast

Check out my Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/PennsyModeler

VonRyan

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 2792
  • Gender: Male
  • Partying like it's still 1944
  • Respect: +177
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2014, 07:31:41 AM »
0
I was hoping my CAD class would get into 3D stuff... But no.
Just 2D... Engineering and Architectual only.
However, IIRC, you can get a 36month free "student" version of AutoCAD.
Gonna wait until I figure out 3D stuff before I get the free deal.
Cody W Fisher - Modeler of the PRR, PRSL, GWR, SZD, and DRG

WWII Clerk/Administration Historian

Switchboard Technician - 33rd Signal Construction Battalion (reenacted)

Squadron Clerk - Capital Wing, Airmans Preservation Society

garethashenden

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1144
  • Respect: +292
Re: Q for the 3D design folks
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2014, 08:42:19 AM »
0
I'm pretty sure Solidworks is in the $3000 per seat range.