Author Topic: Photographing scale models  (Read 604 times)

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OHCR 4218

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Photographing scale models
« on: February 01, 2014, 09:51:52 AM »
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I have recently got a new camera and it got me thinking, what kind of lenses or tricks are people using to photograph models on here, I have seen some truly excellent work on this site over the years. I know I still have a lot to learn about my camera, my first that isn't a point and shoot, but thought I would ask what others are doing? I am working with a Canon T3i and the 18-55 lens that came in the bundle.

Brandon
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Philip H

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Re: Photographing scale models
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2014, 10:06:54 AM »
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I do a lot of DSLR work using a tripod, manual settings for white balance and aperture, and the macro settings in the camera. I also use the 10 second timer so the shutter fires without my hands shifting the camera.

If you want to go fancy, you can get a cable to hook up to your computer and then add software to view the pic as you take them.

My cell phone camera helps do set up shots to makes sure I haven't missed stray dust bunnies in the shot.
Philip H.
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The Beer Baron

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Re: Photographing scale models
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2014, 08:15:37 PM »
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I have recently got a new camera and it got me thinking, what kind of lenses or tricks are people using to photograph models on here, I have seen some truly excellent work on this site over the years. I know I still have a lot to learn about my camera, my first that isn't a point and shoot, but thought I would ask what others are doing? I am working with a Canon T3i and the 18-55 lens that came in the bundle.

Brandon

Funny, I got the same kit for Christmas. I'm still playing with mine a little but my biggest issue is lighting. I live in a 2 bedroom with the missus and there just isn't enough of it. So tip #1 is plenty of lighting.

The second item is something that was mentioned in ModelRailroader a few years ago in a photography article, and that is a macro lense. It allows you to get so much closer to your subject than a standard lens, and not lose focus. I think you can also play with the depth of feild but I'm not positive. I have my eye on something like this little fella. I may try to rent one for a week and see if I like it.

Drew
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OHCR 4218

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Re: Photographing scale models
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2014, 10:10:09 AM »
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I was looking at the same lens and a few others, if your willing to take the risk on a used lens they go for half that on ebay.
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cgw277

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Re: Photographing scale models
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2014, 03:55:44 PM »
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I'm using an old AJ Fricko pinhole lens.
This lens has a depth of field from 4" to infinity. (f 90 )

I'm using a Canon T3i with a Fotodiox Pro lens mount adaptor , converts Canon FD to Canon EOS
 The adaptor allows me to use my old lenses (including the pinhole) on the T3i.

I mount the camera to my tripod, and use the timer so I don't bump the camera during the long exposure.

Much easier than the old days of film. Now you can actually see your results after taking the shot.
Years ago, film was sent in (remember that?) and you didn't know if you actually got the subject in the frame until the pictures were returned.  There was no preview feature with a pinhole lens as it's too dark.

Walthers lists the Fricko as a "batch producer" still in business, but out of stock.

Scot




tom mann

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Re: Photographing scale models
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2014, 05:05:37 PM »
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I use a 50mm macro on a non-full frame camera, which is great for "product" type shots; but I would like to have either a 20 or 35 and a full frame for scenery shots to get the wide-angle effect.