Author Topic: Air ereasing grit  (Read 757 times)

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Chris333

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Air ereasing grit
« on: January 01, 2014, 07:03:44 PM »
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I'm buying one of these air powered grit blaster erasers. I want one to hit etched brass parts with to help paint stick better. I also would like to try it to clean up Shapeways FUD. So the question... What size grit should I be buying to try these things?


C855B

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2014, 07:12:15 PM »
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No firsthand experience here, but in my travels I keep running across recommendations about using baking soda for blast-etching models. FWIW.
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Kisatchie

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2014, 08:09:42 PM »
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I've painted untreated brass with Scalecoat I paint with excellent results. I just sprayed the brass during the summer in my garage, closed all the doors, and let the heat cure the paint. It was bulletproof.


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wcfn100

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2014, 08:20:10 PM »
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I use baking soda, but it's a mess.


Jason

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2014, 09:07:52 PM »
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I use baking soda, but it's a mess.


Jason

I use Badger version of a mini sandblasting gun with aluminum oxide abrasive. It creates a mess too.

Using any kind of powered abrasive through a mini sandblasting gun will create a mess.  :D  That's why the real sandblasters are usually used inside a sandblasting booth.  I use mine in a large plastic storage container partially, covered with a heavy clear plastic film'
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wcfn100

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2014, 09:17:06 PM »
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I have one of those clear inflatable round booths you stick your hands in.  I can't really see much after a couple minutes.  :P

Jason

Chris333

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2014, 03:58:40 AM »
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Well I guess baking soda is always handy.  I'll try some 240 grit as well.

Scottl

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Re: Air ereasing grit
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2014, 07:02:37 AM »
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Smaller particles will erode less material based on their mass.  240 is probably a good start, but plastic like Shapeways FUD may need a finer grit like 400 or 1000.  Baking soda grains are also softer than alum oxide, so for a given size range it might be less aggressive.