Author Topic: Sintra vs. GatorBoard  (Read 6865 times)

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tom mann

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Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« on: June 23, 2010, 11:18:15 AM »
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Anyone have experience with Sintra?

I can get 5 sheets of Sintra 11x14" by 13 mm thick for $60.  Gatorboard at the same size would run about $45 for 10 sheets.

My plan is to build a 1x2 frame out of pine, and laminate 2 layers of foam on the top (a la DKS).  This way, I'll save $$ by not having to buy expensive large sheets.

DKS

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2010, 11:24:00 AM »
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I've not worked with Sintra at all. I imagine the specs might provide some idea what kind of performance can be expected.

But... since Gatorfoam is cheaper, and has known properties, then I'd just get Gatorfoam. Stick with 1/2-inch, as it's the most versatile: works as a base (two laminated layers) and also makes great subroadbed (cut cookie-cutter style).

What size is your final layout? If it's < 2x4 feet, you won't need the pine frame.
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tom mann

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2010, 11:39:06 AM »
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What size is your final layout? If it's < 2x4 feet, you won't need the pine frame.

It'll run along walls, and be < 13' long initially.  But the real reason for the frame was to allow me to laminate smaller pieces of GatorBoard to the top and to solve flexing issues as portions "jut" out 2' into the room (perpendicular to the walls).


tom mann

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2010, 10:58:20 AM »
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BTW...what type of glue are you using to laminate the two layers?

DKS

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2010, 11:10:43 AM »
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BTW...what type of glue are you using to laminate the two layers?



BTW... if you're making a pine frame, you might be able to get by with just one layer. And to bond it to the frame, I'd use carpenter's glue.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2010, 11:15:36 AM by David K. Smith »
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TiVoPrince

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2010, 05:37:55 PM »
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Sintra
could give great annoyance when applying scenery.  It has a closed surface with no open cells for water based methods to adhere to.  I like the 6mm a lot for backdrops where commercial spray adhesives can be effectively used to bond printed materials to it.  20+ years ago I built a HO layout on foamcore (gatorboard) and it was loud as could be, but remarkably stable in a SoCal garage without temperature controls.  With either of these a layer of cork would be suggested to reduce sound transmission...
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Sokramiketes

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2010, 10:31:13 PM »
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Yeah, we played with Sintra on the new HO Modutrak layout for roadbed material.  It's not a laminate like gatorfoam, but rather a solid PVC sheet.  Well, not solid like a PVC pipe, it has enough air pockets to allow easy spiking, which was a need for handlaying HO track. 

For a layout base or cookie cutter roadbed, it will work well.  You won't be carving it easily for scenery though.
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AlkemScaleModels

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2010, 12:11:25 AM »
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Yeah, we played with Sintra on the new HO Modutrak layout for roadbed material.  It's not a laminate like gatorfoam, but rather a solid PVC sheet.  Well, not solid like a PVC pipe, it has enough air pockets to allow easy spiking, which was a need for handlaying HO track.  


I used it to build a 1/24 scale model of a building for a client a few years back. Neat stuff to work with, but can't be laser cut due to the vinyl content.

DKS

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2010, 05:50:51 AM »
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Sintra
could give great annoyance when applying scenery.  It has a closed surface with no open cells for water based methods to adhere to.  I like the 6mm a lot for backdrops where commercial spray adhesives can be effectively used to bond printed materials to it.  20+ years ago I built a HO layout on foamcore (gatorboard) and it was loud as could be, but remarkably stable in a SoCal garage without temperature controls.  With either of these a layer of cork would be suggested to reduce sound transmission...

Just to be clear, Foamcore is not Gatorfoam. They are both laminates, but the outer layers of Foamcore are just heavy paper. The surfaces of Gatorfoam are Luxcell resin-impregnated wood fiber for water resistance, and the foam is denser. It's generally a lot more rigid than Foamcore, and won't warp if wet.

As for noise, scenery will quickly deaden sound. Without scenery applied, it will act as a sounding board, as will most any rigid surface. Extruded styrene foam (insulation board) is also "noisy" without anything but track applied.
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DKS

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2010, 02:59:25 PM »
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Tom, it occurred to me that since you're making a wooden frame, you could also use it for a finished edge by recessing the Gatorfoam, rather than just gluing the foam to the top of the frame. You could either mill out a recess for it, or attach quarter-round to the back. And as I'd mentioned earlier, with the frame you could probably get by with just one layer of foam.
 
« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 03:01:14 PM by David K. Smith »
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Dave Schneider

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2010, 03:21:47 PM »
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How do you guys cut Gatorboard? I have cut big pieces on my table saw with a very fine blade, but I did learn  to only use that blade for Gatorboard. Just a couple of cuts of thin plywood with this blade dulled it slightly and made the cuts a bit "fuzzy" through the outer layer. BTW, I got a bargain on Gatorboard at Kinkos of all places,

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DKS

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Re: Sintra vs. GatorBoard
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2010, 04:30:41 PM »
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I make straight cuts with a utility knife. I just cut through the top layer, then bend the board--it snaps just like drywall!

It is possible to make fairly complex cuts with an X-Acto knife or packing knife, but it takes a fair bit of elbow grease, and several blades. I did all of this cutting with an X-Acto:
 


If I want the most control with the least amount of work, I use a jigsaw with a hollow-ground blade.


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