Author Topic: How to etch  (Read 1433 times)

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tom mann

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How to etch
« on: June 25, 2008, 06:52:22 AM »
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I'll start this off, as it seems like a great skill to learn.

Sokramiketes

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2008, 09:06:23 AM »
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I think Chris has covered this quite a bit on the home etching side.  Instant gratification that way.

If you know a design program, the other option is to draw the parts and send them to an etching house.  It can take a month or more to get parts back, but it keeps the chemicals out of your house and the precision can be a little better.  (Outie rivets too!)

Bob Knight would probably talk to you about custom etching if you use CorelDraw files.  If you know a CAD program like AutoCad, then I can help you out through White City Lines. It's sometimes difficult to find an etching house that will handle small hobbyist orders.  So, for awhile now I've been working with individuals and small manufacturers to combine orders and run parts through one of the big houses.  If you can draw the parts and get them in the right format, I can proof the artwork and get you the parts.

As far as part design goes, the general rule of thumb is that nothing can be smaller than the thickness of the sheet you're etching.  So, .010" brass sheet, the smallest hole you want to etch is .010" diameter, and the smallest line thickness (like the cross hatch for a screen or grill) is .010" wide. 

Here's the guidelines for AutoCAD artwork:
http://www.whitecitylines.com/etchingguidelines.htm

Sample HO parts in Stainless Steel:


Mike

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Chris333

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2008, 10:15:16 AM »
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Man, I need to look up "how to make a layer" with CAD ::)

RDG_Rich

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2008, 06:58:20 PM »
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Along these lines, has anyone had any success with the Micro Mark Etch kit?

Unfortunately I use neither Corel nor CAD. I have Illustrator CS3. It will export into multiple file types, including CAD, but I don't know how well it would work. It wouldn't take much more work to convert the Reading coach drawings to filled in and etchable artwork...


Chris333

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2008, 08:35:09 PM »
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Rich,

You can use any program as long as it will let you print out the image you want. I know CAD (a little) so that is what I use. I have Adobe Illustrator CS2 and I don't know how to use it. You can even use MS word if you know how (I don't).

I have used the Micro Mark kit many many many times. The only way it wouldn't be worth the $$ is if you already have half the stuff laying around. Like if you have a laminator all you really need from Micro Mark is resist film and developer.

RDG_Rich

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2008, 08:41:41 PM »
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Like say...

A standard Heat Seal laminator from your local friendly Staples or Office Max? Because I just happen to have one of those at the office. 8)

CVSNE

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Re: How to etch
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2008, 01:56:58 PM »
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Along these lines, has anyone had any success with the Micro Mark Etch kit?

Unfortunately I use neither Corel nor CAD. I have Illustrator CS3. It will export into multiple file types, including CAD, but I don't know how well it would work. It wouldn't take much more work to convert the Reading coach drawings to filled in and etchable artwork...



Bernie Kempinski does all the Alkem etching art in Adobe Illustrator.

Marty
Modeling (or attempting to model) the Central Vermont circa October 1954  . . .