Author Topic: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...  (Read 5736 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

bsoplinger

  • Guest
Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« on: March 24, 2007, 01:24:14 AM »
0
Since the bits to make a N scale layout around a steel mill are finally starting to show up, especially the Ken Ray models, I started to scour the web for info on layouts folks have done. One I found reference to and a few pictures of was the Columbia River Steel Corporation (its an HO scale layout). The web page for it mentions:

CRSC is in the March, 1999 issue of Model Railroader

My question, for the folks that have stacks of back issues out there, what is the writeup in MR for this layout like? Basically I'm asking is it worth the effort to get that particular back issue?

Thanks

Chris333

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 14275
  • Respect: +3160
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2007, 04:49:11 AM »
0
It's 6 pages of a 24x29 layout that is mostly all steel mill and related operations.

Let me see if I can scan it.

Chris333

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 14275
  • Respect: +3160
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2007, 05:44:32 AM »
0
Got it!

4MB, let me know where to send it...

Until then:
http://www.prairie-works.com/iron.html
« Last Edit: March 24, 2007, 05:59:57 AM by Chris333 »

Iain

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 4596
  • Gender: Female
  • Na sgrìobhaidh a Iain
  • Respect: +284
    • The Best Puppers
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2007, 08:43:06 AM »
0
Chris, I'd like a copy, please.
Thanks much,
Mairi Dulaney, RHCE
Member, Free Software Foundation and Norfolk Southern Historical Society

http://jdulaney.com

tom mann

  • Administrator
  • Crew
  • *****
  • Posts: 10791
  • Representing The Railwire on The Railwire
  • Respect: +853
    • http://www.chicagoswitching.com
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2007, 08:50:05 AM »
0
I admit I'm getting interested in steel production, too.  The new Walthers structures look pretty cool.

sparky

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2007, 10:42:33 AM »
0
This guy has quite the project going.  If the link doesn't take you directly to the page, click on "1:160 model" at the top, then click the pictures for  "Blast Furnaces", "Coke Works", and "Steel Making".  There's some top notch modeling on this site with a lot of kitbashing and scratch building.

http://www.zahkunst.net/mainpage.htm
« Last Edit: March 24, 2007, 10:46:03 AM by sparky »

bsoplinger

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2007, 12:36:26 PM »
0
The reason I asked about the article was because the main web page which has the layout diagram doesn't show any images (at least for me). I went to the way back machine and managed to find an archived version which had the pictures intact, but the layout picture is a 160 pixel high gif. Of that huge layout! Which means you can't really see a thing in terms of what the trackage is at all. I figured if the article had a track layout (especially since the tiny gif looks like the typical MR layout picture, but its so small its hard to tell) that it'd actually be readable  ::)

Also figured that since (tomm?) someone posted the link to the kenray models and the thread had other interested folks that might also be interested in this layout.

BTW: A good, but expensive, source of steel mill modeling (rr and just plant both) is peach creek shops. They have the Peter Boorman's Workshop ladle car and a resin 168 torpedo car. Also a reprint of the book that Walthers included in its big HO 'the works' steel mill kit. The reprint benefits the NMRA so your $55 is well spent.

http://www.peachcreekshops.com/ Then look for steel mill on the menu on the left.

bambuko

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 73
  • Respect: 0
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2007, 05:09:57 PM »
0
This guy has quite the project going...
I have enjoyed this one as well:
http://users.livejournal.com/_nonamenoslogan/?skip=40
Chris

sparky

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2007, 02:52:25 AM »
0
This guy has quite the project going...
I have enjoyed this one as well:
http://users.livejournal.com/_nonamenoslogan/?skip=40
Chris

Wow, that's weird Chris-  it's the same project with a totally different link...

bsoplinger

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2007, 07:50:42 PM »
0
On the general subject of the steel mill, the guy used some of the Plastruct HO kits. They look pretty good. Plastruct doesn't make them in N. So I emailed them asking if the plans were available for purchase, but they aren't. I figured I could scale them down to N scale, but without the plans I'm kinda stuck. Anyone have any great idea?

Zox

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 1120
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +2
    • Lord Zox's Home Page
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2007, 09:00:48 PM »
0
On the general subject of the steel mill, the guy used some of the Plastruct HO kits. They look pretty good. Plastruct doesn't make them in N. So I emailed them asking if the plans were available for purchase, but they aren't. I figured I could scale them down to N scale, but without the plans I'm kinda stuck. Anyone have any great idea?


These may suit your needs:

http://www.peachcreekshops.com/page.php?id=drawings

Please note that I'm not familiar with them myself, so I can't personally vouch for them. But the Peach Creek folks are deep into steel modeling, and I doubt they'd advertise anything sub-par in that area.

Here's a link to the more general steel-modeling page on Peach Creek's site:

http://www.peachcreekshops.com/page.php?id=steel&UID=2007032620545570.108.227.30
Rob M., a.k.a. Zox
z o x @ v e r i z o n . n e t
http://lordzox.com/
It is said a Shaolin chef can wok through walls...

sirenwerks

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 5292
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +188
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2007, 08:00:48 AM »
0
Brian,

You might also try building your own. Plans can be had from one Michael Rabbit of Wayne PA. These plans include:

1:  1970-1980’S BLAST FURNACE
A typical large late 20th century blast furnace.  Four sheets, up to 3’ x 4’, HO Scale.  Plan and elevation of furnace, top works, skip hoist, cast house, stock bins, gas cleaning equipment, stoves and details of valves and equipment.  This design is not of a particular furnace but is a composite of the best information from several sources.

2:  1940’S BLAST FURNACE
Original furnace built in 1943 in the Pittsburgh district and still in blast.  Drawings show the original design with only a few modifications.  Smaller than #1 above.  Three sheets, 3’ x 4’ HO Scale.  Plans and elevations of the furnace, skip hoist, stoves, gas cleaning equipment, piping, stock bins, cast house and ore bridge. 

3:  BESSEMER  CONVERTER  PLANT
Based on a facility built in South Chicago in the late 1890’s, and in operation at least through the 30’s and is similar to plants in use through the 40’s.  Five sheets, 2’ x 3’, HO Scale.  Detailed plans, elevations, sections, including elevations of the building.

4:  120 TON HIGH LIFT CAR DUMPER
Located at Sandusky, Ohio.  Built in 1939 and still loading Lake Boats.  Four sheets, 2’6” x 3’6”, HO Scale. Elevations, plans and sections.

5:  HULETT ORE UNLOADERS
Plans, elevations, sections, details and several  design variations of a “classic” Hulett Unloader of the early 20th century.  Includes elevations of ore bridges and a section through a lake front blast furnace plant.  Five sheets, 2’ x 3’, HO Scale.

6:  LAKEFRONT STEEL MILL PLAN
A medium size integrated steel plant in the Chicago District as it existed in the 1960’s, now demolished.  3’4” x 7’ with side extension, 1”=50’.  Includes coke plant, three blast furnaces, open hearth, BOF, stripper crane, soaking pits, rolling  mills and complete standard and marrow guage track layout.

7:  BLAST FURNACE PLANT PLAN
Plan of the Carrie Furnaces in the Pittsburgh District as of the mid 1940’s, now demolished.  One sheet, 2’6” x 5’3”, 1”=50’.  Railroad supplied six furnace plant showing all trackage, blower and powerhouses, piping, ore bridges, pig caster and various maintenance buildings in addition to the six furnaces.

8:  OPEN HEARTH PLANTS
A 20th century open hearth plant.  Two sheets, 2’6” x 3’6”, HO scale.   Plans, elevations and sections showing scrap yard, charging floor, furnace, teeming aisle, mold preparation yard, overhead cranes and building structure.  One sheet, 3’ x 4’, 1/32”=1’0”, showing six furnace plant, material yard, mold preparation yard, mixer building, stripper building, and narrow and standard guage trackage.

9:  1915 BLAST FURNACE
Plans, elevations and sections of a typical 1915 period furnace as built at Bethlehem Steel on the site of an open top furnace. Five three pass stoves, cast house and gas cleaning equipment plus many details. Three  sheets, 3’ x 4’, HO Scale. Similar to many built in the early 20th C at other plants.

10:  1890’S OPEN TOP FURNACE
Plan and elevations of a typical charcoal or anthracite manually charged open top furnace based on the furnace at Johnson City, Tenn.  Furnaces of this type could still be found in use through the 1920’s with one in use as late as WWII. Six highly detailed sheets, HO Scale.  Includes stock house, furnace, charging elevator, dust catcher, stoves, boilers, blowing engines and much more.

11:  1940’S BESSEMER PLANT
Two vessel Bessemer converter plant including building structure, charging and teeming cranes, stripper crane, mixer and converters.  These drawings are not of a particular plant, but a composite showing the dimensions and details of a typical plant of the period.  Two sheets, 3’ x 4’, HO Scale.

12:  BASIC OXYGEN PLANT (BOF)
Plans, elevations and sections of a 1960’s BOF plant that was to be built using part of a existing open hearth building (shown) as the scrap and teeming aisles.  Three sheets, 3’ x 6’6”, HO Scale.

13:  BBARGE AND SHIP UNLOADER
Wood framed steam powered waterfront unloaded of the late 19th century.  Typical of those found in lake ports, seaports and on river  fronts.  Based on field measurements of the unit located at Norwich, Conn. As of 1962-63.  The unloader structure is close to the original with the bins freelanced.  Three sheets + photos, 1’6” x 2’, HO Scale.         

14:  ELECTRIC MELT SHOPS
A relatively small 1920’s 3 furnace shop (scrap and hot metal charge) and a large modern 4 furnace shop based on a facility built in the mid 50’s, subsequently expanded, and still in use. Includes plan views, sections and elevations.  Five sheets, 3’ x 4’6”, HO Scale.

15:  COKE PLANTS
Plans, sections and elevations taken from several sources showing large and small plants. Includes ovens, coal bins, charging larrys, quench cars and related equipment. One sheet shows, to scale, a typical by products plant in schematic form.  Two sheets 2’6”x3’6”, one sheet 3’x5’ and one sheet 3’x10’, scales vary.

16:  1950’s BLAST FURNACE
A typical 1950’s period design showing the rebuilt “A” furnace at Bethlehem Steel. Six sheets: plans, elevations and sections of furnace, stoves, cast house, venturi gas cleaner and precipitators. This is the second “A” furnace but still using the cast house and stoves of the 1915 furnace.  Sheet sizes: one 2’x3’ and five 3’x4’, HO scale.  Furnace is still in existence.

17: BETHLEHEM PLANT 1924 MAP
1"=100'.  Track plan and all buildings B Fces. A-G, OH, Bessemers, rolling mills, no coke plant, lots of detail. 3'x12'.

18:  ALAN WOOD STEEL & UMP RAILROAD
Four sheets, 1"=50'.  All buildings, NG & std gauge railroad.  A medium size steel plant with 2 blast fce's, OH and, later, a BOF.

19: BETHLEHEM STEEL, 1950-1960 PERIOD
47 2'x3' sheets, 1"=50".  Everything in the plant including coke plant, interchange yards, all the rolling mills, open hearths, BOF, etc.  Lots of detail. 

He says "The sources include original engineering drawings, books, periodicals, photos and site visits.  Almost all of the drawings are of actual equipment with some in use at present.  A number of the sets are composites combining information from several facilities.  All of the sets are done to full scale and are as close to the original as the information at hand allows.  This enables the modeler to modify or selectively compress as needed."

Prices for the drawings range from $10 all the way to $240 for #19. Rabbit can be reached at mrabbitt@snip.net
Now seeking Pacific NW N scalers to create a Modutrak-style modular club featuring NP's shared mainline between Seattle and Portland. PM me if interested.

wiking

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2007, 10:19:54 AM »
0
Brian,
If you know any body in the NMRA have them get you the Dean Freytag book called steel makes a comeback. He is considered one of the best when it comes yo modeling steel mills.

Alan

bsoplinger

  • Guest
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2007, 02:52:33 PM »
0
Brian,
If you know any body in the NMRA have them get you the Dean Freytag book called steel makes a comeback. He is considered one of the best when it comes yo modeling steel mills.

I made reference to the book in my earlier posting (the $55 book), but for others looking at the thread, here's what Peach Creek says about it:
Quote
The History, Making and Modeling of Steel by Dean Freytag. This is the same book that was originally printed by Walthers to go with their first subscription kit, The Works. Dean Freytag and Walthers donated their copyright to the NMRA for one print run. All proceeds from the sale go to support the NMRA

BTW: I already bought the book.

I know all about the plans that Micheal Rabbit offers. I was thinking that since the Plastruct kits are based on their items, if it has a E-20 (90 degreee elbow) I could just use a E-10 (half the size, dirty conversion from HO to N), etc. This would be easier than going from a real drawing where I'd have to pull out the scale rule for everything. The 1/2 of HO = N dirty conversion would have been much easier and plenty close enoughconsidering the scale of steel plants :P

SAH

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 888
  • Respect: +348
Re: Columbia River Steel Corporation layout...
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2007, 05:37:53 PM »
0
If you get REALLY deep into steel mill modeling I'd recco you find a copy of "Making, Shaping and Treating of Steel" by US Steel.  It's the "bible" for steel making professionals.  Everything you would want to know about steel making is in there.  A bit pricey compared to the Freytag book but you will become an expert, if you can stay awake reading it.   ;)

Steve