Author Topic: Scaling  (Read 556 times)

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draskouasshat

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Scaling
« on: January 03, 2023, 10:01:12 AM »
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So, who draws in 1:1 and then scales down to 1:160? I printed my first caboose and it's a tad too small. In fusion360, i highlighted the whole component and used the scale function. I put in 1/160 but i think that was wrong. Any help would be appreciated.

Adam
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ednadolski

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2023, 11:19:21 AM »
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I do that sometimes because Sketchup has trouble handling small diameter curved surfaces.  I also have to deal with the US-Metric conversions between the drawings and the slicer (haven't yet figured out how to match them up -- these programs can be a real PITA some times).   Like anything I expect it to take some tweaking, and modeling some dimensions won't always scale precisely anyways.

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JeffB

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2023, 12:28:01 PM »
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So, who draws in 1:1 and then scales down to 1:160? I printed my first caboose and it's a tad too small. In fusion360, i highlighted the whole component and used the scale function. I put in 1/160 but i think that was wrong. Any help would be appreciated.

Adam

Is it too small in/on all three axis?  Or just one or two?  This matters in terms of how to fix your scaling issue.

I've done both in terms of solid models.  Sometimes I draw things 1:1.  Other times I do them to a specific scale.  Depends on the item.  Some things are better drawn to scale, rather than full size, but others may feel differently about that.

I've had good luck with the scaling function in Chitubox.  Seems to work well enough, but I do sometimes do the scaling in Solid Works.  Again, depends on the item to be scaled.

Jeff

bbussey

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2023, 02:07:54 PM »
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I draw the basic dimensions in 1:1 and then reduce to scale to add the details.  I do the same thing, enter 1/160 or 1/87.1 in the scale factor.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2023, 02:09:40 PM by bbussey »
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wcfn100

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2023, 02:42:58 PM »
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I tend to scale mine on the fly. I use the 1:1 dimension and a scale variable when setting a drawing dimension. For small dimensions like rivets and metal plates, I use a minimum variable based on the printer’s resolution.

Jason

John

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2023, 04:01:41 PM »
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I'm not a pro at this nor do I make stuff commercially -- but I usually draw everything in N scale, or if I do it in HO then I downscale 54%

For railings I will do .6 or .7mm square ..  I also like to keep a minimum thickness of 1-2mm for walls ..

draskouasshat

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2023, 10:01:51 PM »
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Its the whole thing. I believe i might have accidentally done it in the anycubic slicer after chatting with Mr. Bussey.  Everything measured out properly in fusion360 after i scaled it down. Heres my first attempt(number 2 since i didnt bolt down the resin tray the first try)  [ Guests cannot view attachments ] [ Guests cannot view attachments ]

Drasko
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samusi01

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2023, 12:31:37 AM »
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I tend to do everything in scale and make necessary compromises to the design that accommodate the printer. As a fellow Fusion user, I have not yet gotten around to 1:1 and leveraging the parametric capabilities to address printer limitations. Eventually, maybe.

Erock482

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2023, 01:02:22 AM »
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I draw at full size and then scale down to 1:87 in sketchup.

Most slicers seem to have some way of determining the measurement of an item, perhaps your export got a little wonky?

Lemosteam

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2023, 03:51:26 PM »
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I know scaling from 1:1 sounds easier, but I can guarantee you that the cad file becomes so much more complex for the CAD tool to deal with- mostly because many CAD systems have undo buttons, so the tool must remember two unique CAD models in order to revert (if you make a mistake). 

Most CAD tools allow you to input a dimension as a mathematical equation on the fly- this is exactly how I model.

For instance a 12'-3" dimension on the drawing becomes (in my head first to inches (12*12)=144"+3") 147" so the equation is 147/160*25.4 on the fly in the command window, instantly to millimeters.

When you scale, EVERY pixel and surface facet scale as well.  If there are any gaps or surface inconsistencies in the 1:1 model (complex curvatures intersecting with others like fillets, etc.) those become miniscule in N scale and can cause STL file generation issues and slicing issues.

Doing this also FORCES you to design small features to the scale (scale compromise) for printing, etc.

wcfn100

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2023, 06:29:05 PM »
+1
Drawing in N scale can also make it easier to use assemblies of parts you’ve already drawn in N like coupler boxes or trucks. Also if you plan to use already available parts like a diesel horn or boxcar ladder.

Jason

draskouasshat

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Re: Scaling
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2023, 07:06:09 PM »
+1
I think ill follow your technique on the equations john! Thank you!
SFM (Super Fleet Modeler) member #1
I want a 3800 class santa fe 2-10-2!
I want a 3800 class santa fe 2-10-2!
I want a 3800 class santa fe 2-10-2!
I want a 3800 class santa fe 2-10-2!
I want a 3800 class santa fe 2-10-2!
Modeling Cajon Pass in 1947