Author Topic: 3D printed injection molds  (Read 585 times)

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Chris333

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3D printed injection molds
« on: July 10, 2021, 05:22:01 PM »
+3
You know so you can skip just printing the part itself  8)

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The guys voice  :D

reinhardtjh

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2021, 11:39:28 PM »
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That was interesting, but the narration was tough to listen to.
John H. Reinhardt
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Jesse6669

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2021, 11:51:14 AM »
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That was interesting, but the narration was tough to listen to.
I thought he was pretty funny.. "..what we in the industry call 'the moment of truth'"..  :lol:    I think it's a New Orleans (or that area) accent.

reinhardtjh

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2021, 04:33:33 PM »
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I thought he was pretty funny.. "..what we in the industry call 'the moment of truth'"..  :lol:    I think it's a New Orleans (or that area) accent.

Yeah.  I was thinking Cajun.
John H. Reinhardt
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AlwaysSolutions

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2021, 08:39:13 PM »
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I've been a subscriber of his for a couple years now.  In his desire to maintain some sense of privacy he's developed this character "The Crafsman" to add a layer of anonymity, and the voice is of his character (although his natural voice still has that southern Mississippi/Louisiana style)  He cracks me up as "The Crafsman's" speech patterns are very similar of good friends I've had from the Biloxi area..  He says the voice mannerisms are modeled after his grandmother who undoubtedly entertained him with making up silly words based on real words and stringing them together while simultaneously making complete sense.  Anyway, probably TMI but I thought I'd share what I know about "the voice." :D   It's a great channel for people interested in creating and learning techniques while doing without the fast cut, high energy some YouTubers deliver.  If you want to see something funny he's done, he dubbed over a Star Wars scene with character voices from his locale - cracks me up every time: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%24220+lightsaber+from+the+dollar+store

Mike

Lemosteam

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2021, 10:03:39 PM »
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Bet there are 3D maker spaces out there with small injection molding machines too. Been thinking on this for some time. Sprues and inlets, as well as escape ports and ejectors are an art form. Only thing scaring me away. Would rather perfect a metal injection die set for making mech frames, such as extended or shortened proven chassis like the mike, etc.

ncbqguy

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Re: 3D printed injection molds
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2021, 10:36:35 PM »
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Making 3D injection molds for plastic parts is intriguing. 
A number of Model Railroad parts were made with hand cut aluminum molds back in the day.   The plastic injection setups were similar to the one shown in the video...often slightly modified gear that was intended for making rubber stamps.  I think Grant Line started out with such gear.
With 3D printing it probably be possible to make molds with slides for more complicated shapes.
Interesting stuff!
Haven’t poured resin in the EPAX yet...spent yesterday learning how to take existing files, manipulate the scale and orientation and slice and support the first project.
Much to learn but I’m glad to be diving into it!
Charlie Vlk