Author Topic: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop  (Read 708 times)

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glakedylan

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drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« on: August 20, 2020, 08:16:08 PM »
+2
i figure while i cannot do what i want to be doing
that i would do what i could be doing.


hence, working on some 2D images to print and attach to brackdrop
for that moment when i have a layout with a backdrop


here is today's effort
feel free to use if you wish


for N Scale it should be printed with the dimension ratio remaining the same
and the height being 2.75 for 8' ceilings or 3 for 12' ceilings
at bottom is some aged concrete which would be removed that the above dimensions


the image is in 600 pixels/inch to allow some sense of detail as able


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the row homes as Pennsylvania area urban setting, grey block walls with marble
decor at top and wooden frame doors and windows


sincerely
Gary
"all shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well" sjon

Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2020, 08:27:56 PM »
+1
I dig it.

One thing you might want to check out is using Google Street View and a downloader for them to grab some authentic textures.

It's what I did for the backdrop in Bridesburg, which is actually a composite of a couple different downloaded images.

It's a great way to get details like mailboxes and stuff too.

glakedylan

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2020, 08:36:27 PM »
0
thanks ED


i tried that first and i found that even at 600 dpi the images were not very good
of course the problem probably started in using the perspective correct tool in
my graphics software, making the structure rectangular and keeping the dimension
ratio.


then i remembered that i have a bunch of textures and brush tools that allow me
to create exterior walls without too much pattern repeat so that is where i started


perhaps i need to find a good head on shot of a building that fits my context and
not need to mess with the perspective and leveling tools as much as it seems
they work by resizing pixels but not each one to the same degree


i plan of working on these for the rest of the pandemic
and will try to get better quality
the printout in N Scale actually looks much better than the image on computer


thanks again


Gary

"all shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well" sjon

Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2020, 08:42:45 PM »
+1
The trick I've found is to find buildings that have some distance between them and the camera. That means less perspective stuff to work out.

wazzou

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2020, 09:28:23 PM »
+1
I think if you could address the repetition in the window frames, that would really help it look more believable.
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Maletrain

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2020, 09:48:26 PM »
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How about some 3D awnings.

glakedylan

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2020, 10:03:08 PM »
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I think if you could address the repetition in the window frames, that would really help it look more believable.


i will be making differences in the windows
and i invite everyone to put the basic image
into their graphics software and make such changes
it is not meant to be used as is
but as each alters and adds their own diversity


thanks!
Gary
"all shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well" sjon

glakedylan

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2020, 11:17:00 PM »
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here is an example of what one can do with window and door treatments
just using a pattern brush

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sincerely
Gary



"all shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well" sjon

eja

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2020, 12:01:59 AM »
+1
That looks really nice  !

peteski

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2020, 12:34:29 PM »
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While this is a good idea, the windows just look like they were pasted on top of the brick.  In real life brick windows have distinct brick arrangement under them (sill?) and usually, but not always over them (don't know what that is called).  Plus windows are usually inset into the brick (no frame around them).  Do a google image search for brick window to see lots of examples of what I'm talking about.











 At least to me, that is how the windows should look like in a brick wall.
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nickelplate759

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2020, 06:22:31 PM »
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You are right about the word "sill".  The horizontal support over the window is called the "lintel".   If it's a lot of separate bricks and NOT an arch, like the first two windows you show  it's probably just decorative, with a beam (wood, stone or steel) behind the bricks as the functional lintel.  The lintel over your green window is a flat arch - so it's still an arch, as is the more elaborate flat arch (with keystone bricks) over each of the paired white windows.

Architecture is full of unusual words.  Consider "mullion" and "muntin".

A muntin is the bar (can be horizontal, vertical or even angled) that separates each pane of glass in a multipane window.    A mullion is the bar (most often vertical) that joins multiple windows within the same opening.

One more point - in a masonry wall, windows are generally set into the wall, not framed on the surface of the wall as they would be in a wooden building.  You can see that in all of your brick wall examples.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2020, 06:26:21 PM by nickelplate759 »
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glakedylan

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2020, 07:54:14 PM »
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While this is a good idea, the windows just look like they were pasted on top of the brick.  In real life brick windows have distinct brick arrangement under them (sill?) and usually, but not always over them (don't know what that is called). 
Plus windows are usually inset into the brick (no frame around them). 
Do a google image search for brick window to see lots of examples of what I'm talking about.
At least to me, that is how the windows should look like in a brick wall.


hey Pete...i agree and understand completely. that is why i used the 3D effects tool around each door and window with both the buttonize function and the inner beveling tool. seems i will need to made those 3D effects larger as they are blending in too much rather than making the distinctions they normally do, I am guessing that with using 600p/inch that my usual settings may need to be doubled as i usually work in 300p/inch.
thanks for the note.


sincerely
Gary
"all shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well" sjon

thomasjmdavis

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2020, 09:58:14 PM »
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The intention here is to be helpful, but reading what I wrote below I seem to be in lecture mode.... Comes from teaching college students to build realistic theater and film sets....

My observation (and this applies, probably, to the majority of HO and N scale multistory buildings, and a LOT of "professional" backdrop buildings) is that the vertical spacing is off.  The building (at least as it appears on my screen) is not 3 doors tall, and it should be taller (or the door and top line of the windows lower).  Also, if you measure common double hung windows, there will generally be about 30" below the window and 12" above (more space above and taller windows for taller rooms).  So the vertical brickwork between floors should be something like 12" (top of window to ceiling) plus 12" (thickness of ceiling/joist/flooring) plus 30" (floor to window)- so on the order of 4'6"- where the drawing has only 6 courses of brick- about 18". 

And this is probably a typo, but in the OP, it says "and the height being 2.75 for 8' ceilings or 3 for 12' ceilings" 
I think that's right (approx) for the 12'/floor (3" totalling 40' in N scale)- and allows for the thickness of the floors and roof.  But the 8'/floor would be 0.9" shorter, as the building is 4' shorter per floor so
3x4' = 12' = 0.9" in N scale.
Tom D.

peteski

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2020, 12:45:07 AM »
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Architecture is full of unusual words.  Consider "mullion" and "muntin".

A muntin is the bar (can be horizontal, vertical or even angled) that separates each pane of glass in a multipane window.    A mullion is the bar (most often vertical) that joins multiple windows within the same opening.

In my experience mullion is probably the most misused word in model rairoading (applied to model structures).  Modelers keep calling muntins mullions.  Not sure how that started, but I have seen the misuse going bacg decades, even in articles in Model Railroader magazine.
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pdx1955

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Re: drawing some background stuctures for backdrop
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2020, 01:16:16 AM »
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In my experience mullion is probably the most misused word in model rairoading (applied to model structures).  Modelers keep calling muntins mullions.  Not sure how that started, but I have seen the misuse going bacg decades, even in articles in Model Railroader magazine.


I just did a quick internet search - there's plenty of places for real windows that use the correct terminology or go out of their way to point out the difference, but many that do not. I think a good reason for why model railroaders mix it up is because its gets mixed up in the real world too just as often.
Peter

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