Author Topic: New 3D printing technique?  (Read 236 times)

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Maletrain

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New 3D printing technique?
« on: August 01, 2020, 08:38:46 PM »
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Anybody heard of this?  The article is not very informative.  But it says it can be used with existing machines.  Doesn't say what it really is or how it is used.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200731180712.htm

Chris333

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Re: New 3D printing technique?
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2020, 09:01:16 PM »
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So what you 3D print a mold and inject plastic into it?

wcfn100

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Re: New 3D printing technique?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2020, 10:00:38 PM »
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You print the shell of an object and inject material into the inside.  At least that's the way I read it.

Jason

Maletrain

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Re: New 3D printing technique?
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2020, 08:50:46 AM »
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If that is all it is, I don't see how it could be patented.

Maybe it is just software that turns the drawing of the desired final product (3D object) into some sort of negative that becomes a mold.  But, a good mold is not just a solid with an inside surface that is the outside of a 3D object.  It needs some thinking about object removal, flash minimization, venting for void elimination, etc.  And, what about all those surface smoothness issues we have on 3D prints, already - how does this technique deal with them?

The article seemed a little strange for Science News to publish in the first place.  It has no info about what was really accomplished by the author, just hype.  That is why I asked here if anybody has any info.

wcfn100

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Re: New 3D printing technique?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2020, 12:34:06 PM »
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If that is all it is, I don't see how it could be patented.


You can patent the process.

This is just modification of extrusion printing and has little to do with the resin printing we do here.

Jason