Author Topic: Olympus train focusing mode  (Read 804 times)

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tom mann

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Olympus train focusing mode
« on: April 24, 2020, 09:06:06 AM »
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I became a fan of Micro 4/3s when I was researching a new camera system to take on a trip to Africa.  Olympus is one of the major M43 players, and a year ago they released a camera (EM1X) that could automatically focus on trains.  Here's a demo.  You can see the focus point is dynamically placed over the cab.

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It's pretty cool, but I wouldn't necessarily go out and buy the camera just for this feature.

Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2020, 10:18:06 AM »
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Holy crap. That has the same potential for railfanning that auto-HDR did for selfies!

C855B

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2020, 10:30:58 AM »
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Not sure how I feel about yet another "our engineers are better 'n you" feature that likely has an arcane menu, sub-menu, or sub-sub-menu in order to turn it off when you want to do something that doesn't fit their algorithm. Provided that you aren't past the "OH $#!+" moment when it did something you didn't want it to do and the opportunity was lost. I don't do that much photography these days, but I fight the assumed, engineered-in functions with my new Canon nearly every time I use it.  :|

MK

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2020, 11:51:08 AM »
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It's not really train specific focusing per se.  It's 3D focus tracking.  You can do the same with that camera (or any others with 3D focus tracking) on airplanes, race cars, trains, horses, etc.

My Nikon D500 has 3D focus tracking and it's a hoot when taking shots of R/C airplanes flying through the sky.  It just tracks them.  3D focus tracking is not 100% but awfully close.

tom mann

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2020, 02:20:49 PM »
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Actually the Olympus system is train-specific.  They have a machine learning algorithm that is currently trained on motorsports, airplanes, and trains.

peteski

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2020, 02:37:04 PM »
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Actually the Olympus system is train-specific.  They have a machine learning algorithm that is currently trained on motorsports, airplanes, and trains.

Can you select "steam" or  "diesel"?  :D
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tom mann

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2020, 02:58:42 PM »
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Can you select "steam" or  "diesel"?  :D

I'm not sure you can even select "Japanese Electric" or "American Diesel"!

peteski

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2020, 04:07:50 PM »
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I'm not sure you can even select "Japanese Electric" or "American Diesel"!

Ah, machine learnign has not advanced that far yet.   ;)
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Ed Kapuscinski

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Re: Olympus train focusing mode
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2020, 04:17:41 PM »
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Not sure how I feel about yet another "our engineers are better 'n you" feature that likely has an arcane menu, sub-menu, or sub-sub-menu in order to turn it off when you want to do something that doesn't fit their algorithm. Provided that you aren't past the "OH $#!+" moment when it did something you didn't want it to do and the opportunity was lost. I don't do that much photography these days, but I fight the assumed, engineered-in functions with my new Canon nearly every time I use it.  :|

I don't know. I've found the auto modes to be pretty handy on my relatively recent Canon. And when I don't want something to happen there's always that "M" setting.

Personally, I'm all for stuff that makes it easier to not miss getting shots of limited opportunities.



http://railfanning.kapuscinski.net/2017/08/a-sunday-on-the-strasburg-july-2017/