Author Topic: Coloring a B&W photo  (Read 2918 times)

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MK

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #30 on: April 11, 2020, 04:54:29 PM »
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DOS is quite Unix like if you look deep into it.

peteski

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #31 on: April 11, 2020, 09:02:04 PM »
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DOS is quite Unix like if you look deep into it.

Well, they are both Operatign Systems. So there will be some similarities. While commands such as "cd" are the same in both, other commands have slightly different spelling. For example md/mkdir , del/rm, move/mv are examples commands that have similar function but different spelling.

So, while some commands are similar, MS-DOS was based on 86-DOS, Which in turn imitated CP/M OS. 
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nkalanaga

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #32 on: April 12, 2020, 02:22:10 AM »
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Peteski:  My experience with Unix is limited to a short time at work, when they sent us a PC running Xenix, which apparently was an off-brand Unix clone.  Rather than write programs for a PC, or buy us a small mainframe, they wrote Unisys-mainframe-lookalike programs to run as subroutines, in a Xenix program, which we weren't supposed to see.

The problem was that, since it numbered each "program" we ran sequentially, and they only allowed 99 numbers, after a couple days the main program would refuse to start any more "programs".  There was no elegant way to reset it, so they told us to power-cycle the machine.  Of course, that killed all of the "programs" that were still running, which wasn't a good idea in a production environment.

Reading a novel, totally unrelated to work, I came across a throw-away mention of how to stop a program in Unix.  Out of curiosity, I tried it, and it worked.  Surprisingly, it also kept the print jobs that had already started running, so we could at least get control of the computer back. 

We ran that mess for a year, before the other data centers got so fed up that Systems wrote all-new programs for Windows XP, and got us new PCs.  The site manager and I both had programming experience, she'd worked as a production programmer, and nether of us ever told the company how we kept it running.  Systems would probably not have liked "mere operators" messing with their software.
N Kalanaga
Be well

peteski

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #33 on: April 12, 2020, 05:18:56 AM »
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It is unusual to hear about migrating from Unix to Windows - usually it is done the other way around.
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DKS

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #34 on: April 12, 2020, 07:56:01 AM »
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matze

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #35 on: April 13, 2020, 11:23:34 AM »
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I ran a few photos through it.. and unless it has wide range of 'known' colors to assume, it has a hard time rendering colors.

It would be nice to have an eye dropper so we could tell it known colors.
For example.. It doesn't know Brown and Orange..
(Attachment Link)
(from Railpictures.net)
https://www.railpictures.net/photo/652974/

This is probably due to the bias in the training samples used, as the machine learning algorithm (this is not really AI) can only color what it has previously seen. Makes me wonder if one could produce a better "biased" training that was more road-specific, i.e., using lots of Milwaukee passenger equipment, and then having better results. Or provide additional inputs to get to tune the output better.

I would be tempted to try, but none of my computing devices have the required computing power to retrain the algorithm as stated on the installation instructions…

Sokramiketes

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Re: Coloring a B&W photo
« Reply #36 on: April 13, 2020, 03:20:40 PM »
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There’s more than one type of film process for black and white photos, so it wouldn’t surprise me if some convey color data better than others.