Author Topic: How to model glacial river with rapids?  (Read 946 times)

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nkalanaga

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2019, 01:55:04 AM »
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Yes, you should have good river pictures.  Like model railroaders, kayakers are more interested in the river than in "art", so the pictures should show the important details. 
N Kalanaga
Be well

craigolio1

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2019, 08:39:08 AM »
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Yes, you should have good river pictures.  Like model railroaders, kayakers are more interested in the river than in "art", so the pictures should show the important details.

Good call

Angus Shops

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2019, 02:34:41 AM »
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Craig,
Yes, this is a difficult challenge. I'll be challenged to reproduce large areas of the Kicking Horse River, with a very similar look to your scene. The last time I tried it I used a plaster base into which I formed the larger of the waves, holes and other major water formations. I used really watery plaster so it would flow easily around shoreline features and form a basically flat surface and formed the waves etc. as it started to set. Starting with such watery plaster resulted in a not very strong plaster base, so I hardened it by soaking it with diluted white glue and letting it dry. I plan to test a product intended to make rotted wood solid instead of the diluted white glue. I've used it for its intended purpose; it's a clear liquid that soaks into the wood and sets up hard.
I painted the plaster with an opaque white/blue/green colour appropriate for the season and then applied several coats of a high quality artists gloss medium.  You can add additional waves and textures at this stage, and white water is white paint under at least one layer of the artist's gloss. Aarist's gloss is good because it doesn't yellow and dries hard with no stickiness to trap dust and such.
In retrospect, a good milky river may be easier to model than a clearwater river; except for the rocks at the shallowest part of the river, the rest of the river bottom is invisible. The colour and clarity of the river also changes with seasons and location; a particularly murky or a good clear tributary will define the downstream water.
As a fly fisherman I can attest to amount a river can change over the course to a year. The spring floods can completely change the course of the river and I often return to rivers annually to find the layout unrecognizable from the previous year, leaving acres of empty gravel and stone while the river has plowed a new course through the forest in an inaccessible tangle of downed trees. I also much prefer the clear water rivers to the milky ones 'cause you can see what's going on under the water surface.
Geoff

basementcalling

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2019, 03:14:52 PM »
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Great ideas. I never thought of layering the gloss and the white. I think that’s worth a try. A visit is not possible as it’s on the other side of the country. But its a popular kayaking locale so lots of pictures of the rapids are available on line. As for the shape of the river at the bridge site, well that’s up to me. That bridge that I’m modelling was put in after a wash out. Shortly after that it was was altered so that a siding could be lengthened and it was paired with another bridge. They’ve since been washed out and replaced again. So that river changes every year. I just want to get the colour right.

Thanks again!

Definitely study a kayak site and photos of the rivers they run. Too often swift rivers in model form have the waves in the wrong places, which ruins the effect.

Flow level can impact your model too. Are you modeling spring when run off is plentiful and waves are larger, or summer or fall when far more rocks stick out of the river for boaters to go around?

I would also strongly suggest NOT using an epoxy that is going to have a surface tension that causes the edges to creep up or curve up on the banks or edge of rocks in the river. Stick with thin coats of uerathane or gloss medium over plaster.

I've wondered lately about getting overhead drone footage of a river and placing that in the riverbed, then gloss coating over the top. It would definitely get the coloration correct, but might not be good for a very rocky area.
Peter Pfotenhauer

craigolio1

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2019, 08:50:36 AM »
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Neat idea with the drone footage. You could use that to properly place rocks and there for water features.

I’m on the technical rescue truck at work and one of our disciplines is swift water rescue. So I am fairly well versed in river features.

With a photo like that of a river you could properly place those rocks. currents, eddies, pillow rocks, up and downstream Vs.

The photo may be completely covered after but everything would be just right.


Big Train

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2019, 10:38:46 AM »
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If you're handy with an airbrush spray the river bed light green (BCR Light Green?) and earth tones then spray white highlights where required, like around the rocks. I think in this case the airbrush is your new best friend.

I like working with Liquitex, or equivalent, Acrylic Gloss Mediums for water features because as someone has already pointed out it never yellows.

For creating rapids, try using Liquidtex Gloss Gel Medium. It has a thicker consistency and can be worked around rocks while it is curing. Regular acrylic medium has a leveller in it to obtain a smooth surface. I find using Gel medium allows me to create wave effects using a short stiff stippling brush to work it around rocks. You can also apply Gel medium over previously applied regular medium.

I believe you can tint acrylic mediums to achieve the transparency you're looking for. I'm sure the Liquitex website will have further information.

Like other have said some experimentation is in order. But I think your results should be spectacular.

And it doesn't have to be Liquitex acrylic mediums. For our application, the cheaper "student grades" of acrylic mediums available at Michael's, Curry's or any art supply store will work the same.

Hope this helps...


craigolio1

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2019, 10:13:09 AM »
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Guys there is so much good info here. I’ll need to reread this a few times and take notes so I can be sure to experiment with all of these tips.

Thanks.

Craig.

ednadolski

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2019, 01:40:26 PM »
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Can anyone direct to a tutorial, or advise me, on how I might model a glacial river with fast moving water/rapids? 

These are so much fun to watch, the results are amazing:

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craigolio1

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Re: How to model glacial river with rapids?
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2019, 03:03:51 AM »
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@ednadolski , man those are some inspiring videos.