Author Topic: Dover Harbor car  (Read 610 times)

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trainforfun

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Dover Harbor car
« on: September 15, 2019, 03:34:31 PM »
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I had the joy of riding that car in 2017 in an excursion behind N&W 611 , we went to Asheville going up a couple of loops , since then I wanted one for my layout .
I bought 2 cars made with a 3D printer , I have to admit it's still pretty rough even after it's painted , I was hoping the thin layer of paint would have hide the ripple , but not enough ...
I am in the process of finishing the cars , I have to letters the cars letters by letters ...
It's a Pullman car that have run on NYC for a while and it's a car that you can rent , Amtrak will pull it for you , it's based in Washington .

There was no glass included in the kit , I was thinking of thin clear styrene or acetate at first , but the way the car was designed for the 3D printing , it's very difficult to install in some rooms .
I heard about a liquid product for model windows and windshield .

Anybody knows the name of the product and how to install it ?
Should I spray the dull finish first , and then finish with the liquid windows ?
« Last Edit: September 15, 2019, 07:18:01 PM by trainforfun »
Thanks ,
Louis



Skeebo

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Re: Dover Harbor car
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2019, 10:00:39 AM »
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      Micro Scale makes Micro Kristal Klear, But I would NOT recommend it, especially for passenger cars. I do find it is an excellent canopy glue to hold windows in though. For my super detailed U50's that I put full interiors into the cabs, I used clear styrene trimmed to fit. That may be your best option.
      As for 3D printed shells/bodies, It sounds like it's too late now. But for future reference, this list did put me onto Tamiya primer with filler. It goes a long way toward minimizing the styration effect of 3D printing. It does take some work though, primer, wet sand, primer, wet sand etc. until you get the surface you're happy with.
      Good Luck,  Jim

bbunge

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Re: Dover Harbor car
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2019, 04:39:09 PM »
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I've used Mr Surfacer 500 to help with 3D surfaces, although it does take several layers and sanding depending on how good you want it to look.  I found this stuff on both Ebay and Amazon, but it had to be shipped from Japan.

Bob

trainforfun

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Re: Dover Harbor car
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2019, 04:05:47 PM »
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      Micro Scale makes Micro Kristal Klear, But I would NOT recommend it, especially for passenger cars. I do find it is an excellent canopy glue to hold windows in though. For my super detailed U50's that I put full interiors into the cabs, I used clear styrene trimmed to fit. That may be your best option.
      As for 3D printed shells/bodies, It sounds like it's too late now. But for future reference, this list did put me onto Tamiya primer with filler. It goes a long way toward minimizing the styration effect of 3D printing. It does take some work though, primer, wet sand, primer, wet sand etc. until you get the surface you're happy with.
      Good Luck,  Jim

Thanks for your suggestions . I have like 35 windows per car ... and some are accessible only from exterior .
As per the ripples the worst are placed on the panels under the windows and the ones on the roof are very acceptable , so it could be worst .
Thanks ,
Louis



trainforfun

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Re: Dover Harbor car
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2019, 04:06:32 PM »
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I've used Mr Surfacer 500 to help with 3D surfaces, although it does take several layers and sanding depending on how good you want it to look.  I found this stuff on both Ebay and Amazon, but it had to be shipped from Japan.

Bob

I will try it on my next project !
Thanks
Thanks ,
Louis