Author Topic: "DCC in a box"  (Read 2783 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Ed Kapuscinski

  • Global Moderator
  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 17792
  • Has a degree in American History & Culture.
  • Respect: +2086
    • Conrail 1285
Re: "DCC in a box"
« Reply #75 on: June 03, 2019, 04:43:22 PM »
+1
Adding some pics from my recent progress here.

I realized the thing was going to need a screwdriver. So I finally did "Step 2" and cut a hole in the box. The screwdriver is actually held in place with a hidden small strip of velcro.



More importantly I figured out how to seal up the edges of the deck. Instead of putting something on the deck itself, I applied some foam tape between the internal supports that extends beyond the deck lid. This allows me to control airflow (ie, limit it to the intake) which is important for proper cooling. I don't want the exhaust fan drawing in air that didn't circulate past the power supply, which is what was happening before I sealed it up. As part of this I also applied new covers over the openings: a grill and filter over the intake and a simple grill over the exhaust.

Also pictured here (but not yet attached) are the two handles I'm installing for lifting the deck off. I've been grabbing the PR3 to do it so far and I don't like that as a long-term solution. I DO want the deck easily removable though because I intend to use the interior space for storage of things like throttles between uses.



I'm definitely coming down the home stretch here. I think at this point the only tasks remaining are:
1. Source and install deck edging.
2. Build throttle pocket holders.
3. Source and install more permanent component storage inside the lid.

But none of those prevent it from being used.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2019, 04:50:01 PM by Ed Kapuscinski »

Ed Kapuscinski

  • Global Moderator
  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 17792
  • Has a degree in American History & Culture.
  • Respect: +2086
    • Conrail 1285
Re: "DCC in a box"
« Reply #76 on: July 08, 2019, 11:18:08 AM »
+4
I decided that this year my dad's birthday present would be his own DCC in a box. And as I typed that I realized how truly messed up it sounds. Anyway...

His setup is a bit different than mine. The goal for him was to make it easy to power a layout wherever he goes but without all the overkill of my rig and WITH a DC capability.



That meant his setup was quite a bit simpler. He's got a Zephyr for DCC capability, a PR3 (hidden under the deck) and an MRC Railpower 1370.



AC power is provided by a nice long extension cable because his setup needs to be easily accessible to use (unlike mine which can get stuffed under a layout). Getting a cable with the right female plug orientation was important in order to keep the orientation of the PR3's Digitrax wall wart oriented properly under the deck (it wouldn't work if it was pointing straight up).

Unlike my box that had a natural "shelf" around it for the deck to sit on, his needed risers made of 1x2 and affixed with double sided foam tape. I'm hoping those are skookum enough over time. If not, we'll come up with some other plan.

He's going to be making a set of wires up for it with powerpoles, Cinch Jones plugs and Unitrack plugs and leaving them attached to the terminal strips. That means he won't have to fuss with it connecting to a layout unless he needs more feeders of one type.

He also didn't want a permanent programming track so the PR3's output is just piped out through a Unitrack plug. The USB cable sneaks out through a gap in the lower right.

It was a fun weekend project and I hope it serves him well!

PrajwalKale

  • Posts: 2
  • Respect: 0
Re: "DCC in a box"
« Reply #77 on: July 17, 2019, 01:39:42 AM »
0
Leaving the DCS 200 will be track control that gets part to the three circuit breakers. Two are OG-ARs and one is a standard OG. I figure I have em, should utilize them. I figure I'll connect that all to a decent board to hold it all set up. The yield from those will fly through the "deck" to three-terminal strips. Those strips will at that point have the proper tech tool Unitrack connectors joined to them. By making those effectively open screw terminals I can make it simple to associate it to something other than what's expected if need be. I may likewise do another terminal strip that is simply "crude" track control too (straight from the order station without the middle of the road circuit breakers). That relies upon how it spreads out.