Author Topic: Component lay out on ESU micro select  (Read 707 times)

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Onizukachan

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2019, 02:22:51 AM »
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I will add,  cone type speakers can short the tinsel leads at high excursion. Rare, but possible, and since it is the second time...
You might want to connect a multimeter to the speaker itself (in situ if possible ) and gently move the cone back and forth, while monitoring impedance for a short.

woodone

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2019, 11:33:43 AM »
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Yes, that is the component that has the damage. The speaker is a 15MM speaker, 8 ohm, 0.5 watt and a frequency range of 400 Hz-20 Hz. The speaker is still good. Has I have replaced the decoder and ever thing is working now.
Maybe I should turn the volume down?

peteski

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2019, 11:45:38 AM »
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Yes, that is the component that has the damage. The speaker is a 15MM speaker, 8 ohm, 0.5 watt and a frequency range of 400 Hz-20 Hz. The speaker is still good. Has I have replaced the decoder and ever thing is working now.
Maybe I should turn the volume down?

I would have difficult time believing that too high of a volume would have blown the audio amp, especially with 8 ohm speaker (since the amp can handle speakers down to 4 ohms).  But short between any speaker wires and live chassis, or short between the speaker leads themselves would blow the the amp.

Onizukachan does have a point that there might be a possibility that the high excursion of the speaker cone (due to high volume of sound) might cause short of the wires which connect the speaker terminals to the voice coil (I don't think tinsel leads are used in such small speaker - it is probably just the same thin wire used in the voice coil windings).  But that is also doubtful as the speaker's "basket" is usually plastic (not metal).  Do you think the volume was up too high?  The amp is definitely rated for a higher power than the speaker can handle.
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Point353

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2019, 12:49:52 PM »
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I would have difficult time believing that too high of a volume would have blown the audio amp, especially with 8 ohm speaker (since the amp can handle speakers down to 4 ohms).  But short between any speaker wires and live chassis, or short between the speaker leads themselves would blow the the amp.
It would be interesting to know which IC is being used for the speaker amp.
Some of the latest speaker amps include not only built-in protection for the amp itself but also adjustable limits to avoid over-driving the speaker.

reinhardtjh

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2019, 01:15:50 PM »
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It would be interesting to know which IC is being used for the speaker amp.
Some of the latest speaker amps include not only built-in protection for the amp itself but also adjustable limits to avoid over-driving the speaker.

Probably not the case as ESU admits and warns in it's manuals that shorting the speaker output will blow the amp and have to be sent in for repair/replacement.  Maybe the V5 though...

ESU does state that the motor outputs are protected against over current/shorting and will shut down (usually) without damage, but not the sound amp.
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woodone

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Re: Component lay out on ESU micro select
« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2019, 03:49:45 PM »
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this speaker is mounted in a metal frame. The two magnet wires are attached to a very small PC board, this is also where you attach the speaker wires coming from the decoder. Has I stated in an earlier post, the wires go through a small hole in the frame. These wires are held in place with a caulking material that has insulating abilities. I also used the caulking to cover the PC connections on the speaker because this speaker is mounted into a blind hole in the metal frame. I see no way that a speaker wire could have shorted to the frame or to each other. I have done a bunch of F3/7s the same way with out any problems. One thing that I always check is to see if I might have a speaker wire touching the frame by touching one speaker to a meter and to the frame to check for any conductive. I do that before I solder the speaker wires to the speaker.