Author Topic: Geology Question - type of formation  (Read 241 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

CRL

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 113
  • Respect: +32
Geology Question - type of formation
« on: February 08, 2019, 09:57:25 PM »
0
Does anyone know what type of rock strata formation this is? Location in SE Arizona. I know it’s volcanic ash layers that have been eroded, but the name escapes me. Thanks.

[ Guests cannot view attachments ] [ Guests cannot view attachments ] [ Guests cannot view attachments ]

wazzou

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 4017
  • #GoCougs
  • Respect: +341
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2019, 10:45:08 PM »
0
Basalt?
Bryan

Member of NPRHA, Modeling Committee Member
http://www.nprha.org/
Member of MRHA

Jbub

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 697
  • Gender: Male
  • HP 9999
  • Respect: +144
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2019, 11:00:51 PM »
0
Tuff
"Noooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!"

Darth Vader

Jbub

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 697
  • Gender: Male
  • HP 9999
  • Respect: +144
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2019, 11:08:04 PM »
0
If you know the exact location there is this map to help identify what you're looking for.

http://data.azgs.az.gov/geologic-map-of-arizona/#

Just click on the location and it will tell you what type of formation it is.
"Noooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!"

Darth Vader

CRL

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 113
  • Respect: +32
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2019, 11:30:55 PM »
0
If you know the exact location there is this map to help identify what you're looking for.

http://data.azgs.az.gov/geologic-map-of-arizona/#

Just click on the location and it will tell you what type of formation it is.
Thanks for the map, which says: Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. These deposits are generally light gray or tan. They commonly form high rounded hills and ridges in modern basins, and locally form prominent bluffs. Deposits of this unit are widely exposed in the dissected basins of southeastern and central Arizona.

Basically, I guess, random crap and sandstone.



peteski

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 19091
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +1570
    • Coming (not so) soon...
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2019, 01:38:33 AM »
0
Thanks for the map, which says: Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. These deposits are generally light gray or tan. They commonly form high rounded hills and ridges in modern basins, and locally form prominent bluffs. Deposits of this unit are widely exposed in the dissected basins of southeastern and central Arizona.

Basically, I guess, random crap and sandstone.

Sounds like an ancient ocean floor material.
--- Peteski de Snarkski
--- Honorary Resident Curmudgeon

Chris333

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 12699
  • Respect: +2269
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2019, 04:02:26 AM »
+1
This guy has some good stuff that might help:

CRL

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 113
  • Respect: +32
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2019, 01:14:12 PM »
0
Sounds like an ancient ocean floor material.

You’re probably correct... really ancient. The mustard color shows the volcanic tuff areas at higher elevations nearby. One of the interesting things of this area is the strata appear to be relatively level. Almost perfect for modeling.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 01:21:38 PM by CRL »

Philip H

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 7220
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +406
    • Layout Progress Blog
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2019, 07:26:15 PM »
0
SE Arizona is definitely relict ocean bottom.
Philip H.
Chief Everything Officer
Baton Rouge Southern RR - Mount Rainier Division.

"Yes there are somethings that are "off;" but hey, so what." ~ Wyatt

"I'm trying to have less cranial rectal inversion with this." - Ed K.

Jbub

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 697
  • Gender: Male
  • HP 9999
  • Respect: +144
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2019, 07:48:02 PM »
0
I can't remember what National Parks visitor center it was in but the display showed a timeline that had the whole southwest as ocean bottom at least a couple of times in ancient history. It was either Grand Canyon, Arches, Bryce Canyon or Canyonlands.
"Noooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!"

Darth Vader

sirenwerks

  • Crew
  • *
  • Posts: 5128
  • Gender: Male
  • Respect: +128
Re: Geology Question - type of formation
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2019, 10:42:42 PM »
0
You’re probably correct... really ancient. The mustard color shows the volcanic tuff areas at higher elevations nearby. One of the interesting things of this area is the strata appear to be relatively level. Almost perfect for modeling.


More like lahar deposits, I think. Lahars are the mud and debris flows that come after the initial release, and build with local water sources. Basically, natures cement mixer.
Now seeking Pacific NW N scalers to create a Modutrak-style modular club featuring NP's shared mainline between Seattle and Portland. PM me if interested.