Author Topic: Tragedy in BC (CPR Derailment/Fatalities)  (Read 473 times)

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Blazeman

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Joetrain59

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Re: Tragedy in BC (CPR Derailment/Fatalities)
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2019, 01:19:05 AM »
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Very tragic and horrific for the crew. Condolences to all affected.
 Joe D

Blazeman

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Re: Tragedy in BC (CPR Derailment/Fatalities)
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2019, 11:47:27 AM »
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https://www.progressiverailroading.com/canadian_pacific/news/TSB-Canadian-Pacific-train-moved-on-its-own-before-fatal-derailment--56686?

Prior to the accident, the train had been stopped with the air brakes applied in emergency at Partridge, the last station located ahead of the entrance to the Urban Spiral Tunnel. A change-off of the crew took place, but the second crew was not yet ready to depart.

The train had been stopped on the grade, with the air brakes in emergency for about two hours when the train started to move. There were no hand brakes applied on the train, which began to accelerate to a speed in excess of the maximum track speed of 20 mph for the tight curves and steep mountain grade. The train then derailed

nkalanaga

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Re: Tragedy in BC (CPR Derailment/Fatalities)
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2019, 02:00:28 AM »
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Sounds like the air bled off while it was sitting.  GN, NP, and BN rules all said that air brakes alone should never be relied on to hold a train parked on a grade.  If the train was stopped for any length of time, enough hand brakes should be set to hold the train. 

If the train was in a siding, waiting for a meet, using just the air brakes would be acceptable, but then they wouldn't be in emergency, and it shouldn't be for two hours.  Once the train is in emergency there's no way to recharge the brake line without releasing the brakes, and eventually the pressure in the reservoirs will be depleted by leakage in the cylinders.  At that point the brakes release on their own, and you're moving.

I don't know if any railroad routinely uses retainers today, but that's what they were for - keeping a brake application while the train line and reservoirs were recharging.  Very handy on long grades before dynamic brakes.
N Kalanaga
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nkalanaga

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Re: Tragedy in BC (CPR Derailment/Fatalities)
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2019, 03:11:40 PM »
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From CBC News:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/train-derailment-field-bc-brakes-1.5012442

Canadian authorities have now required the use of handbrakes at any emergency stop on a grade of 1.8% or more.

They have also repeated that the wreck was NOT the fault of this crew.  They had just boarded the train, and did nothing to cause it to move.
N Kalanaga
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