Author Topic: Simulate glass  (Read 2300 times)

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peteski

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2018, 01:50:26 PM »
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Here are some examples for Peteski's files.

I built this GHQ Dodge Caravan not too long after they first came out (about 30 years ago now!). Excuse the dust.  :)







IIRC, I used Testors transparent candy red or maybe ruby red over bare pewter for the metallic look.

This is what I  used for ink.  It was used in compiter plotter pen. I got a bottle from work when they decommissioned the plotter 30+ years ago.  Note that this is not a regular India Ink, but it is Latex based.  It is slightly more viscous (but not much) and easier to work with.  IIRC, I applied it with a wooden toothpick (I wish I have taken notes back then).  I think I would just dip the toothpick in a puddle if ink, then touch it in the middle of the window opening and then spread it out to the edges of the window.  The ink spread nicely without getting out of the window area.



Here is another example. This time I mixed a bit of white ink into the same black ink I used on the Caravan.



While these vehicles do not look bad, I still much prefer transparent windows.

--- Peteski de Snarkski
--- Honorary Resident Curmudgeon

MarcVanCleven

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2018, 04:29:59 PM »
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Hi,

I have been away dealing with family matters so I apologize.

I attached some photos showing the difference in the appearance of windows, particularly when dealing with "solid" windows and vehicles. I also found using a 0.5 mechanical pencil works very well, especially in tight window spaces.


I think the photos are self explanatory. These are not coated with any gloss coating to protect them.


Marc in Madison WI

Maletrain

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2018, 09:09:17 AM »
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Peteski,

Really nice model painting.  I notice that you have a license plate on the back of your Caravan.  Care to tell us how you made that look decent?  (I am assuming this is N scale, but it looks better than some of the HO stuff, mainly because you did such a good job of "coloring inside the lines.")  Kudos!  By the way, my 1:1 Tahoe has "dust" like that, too.

peteski

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2018, 09:36:44 PM »
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Peteski,

Really nice model painting.  I notice that you have a license plate on the back of your Caravan.  Care to tell us how you made that look decent?  (I am assuming this is N scale, but it looks better than some of the HO stuff, mainly because you did such a good job of "coloring inside the lines.")  Kudos!  By the way, my 1:1 Tahoe has "dust" like that, too.

Thanks!  LOL about your 1:1 dusty vehicle.
I can't take the credit for that license plate - Microscale sells a sheet of N scale automobile license plates - I can only take a credit for applying it to the model.
--- Peteski de Snarkski
--- Honorary Resident Curmudgeon

Maletrain

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2018, 09:20:23 AM »
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Good to know about the license plate decals. Thanks.

fotoflojoe

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #35 on: December 12, 2018, 11:51:17 PM »
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Are the window recesses in those Humvees too small to support this stuff? I've never used it in anything smaller that 1/48 scale war bird models, but it works great emulating windows.
https://www.amazon.com/Micro-Kristal-Klear-Microscale-Industries/dp/B0006O029E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1544676519&sr=8-1&keywords=micro+kristal+klear

CHUCKGEO

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ACE Hardware House Number Material
« Reply #36 on: December 27, 2018, 02:42:04 PM »
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I've used a shiny black plastic/vinyl material ACE Hardware offers as house numbers.  I purchase the Roman Numerals (Is) as it gives the most area. The material is a thin vinyl plastic with a sticky backing.  I've used this technique for windows on 1/43rd and 1/64th solid window resin castings, and it works well on flat surfaces. No reason it shouldn't work on N scale vehicles. You'd need a small scissors or Xacto blade to cut. Most numbers also have a silver border, that can also be used for windows or trim. Numbers only cost 35 cents to a buck, so worth a try.