Author Topic: Simulate glass  (Read 1505 times)

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John

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Simulate glass
« on: December 01, 2018, 01:16:01 PM »
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I picked up some of these on Shapeways to build out my military train ..  whats the braintrust consensus for making the windshields look like like they actually have glass in them?  I'm thinking painting a dark gray in the area whee the window is  then putting some mod-podge gloss over the top


Chris333

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2018, 04:14:29 PM »
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Just paint them solid black or very dark blue.

robert3985

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2018, 04:51:47 PM »
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These would be easy!  Since they're flat and rectangular, if I was REALLY concerned about making them look like the windows were glass, I'l file 'em out with a small precision jeweler's file, and cut microscope cover glass to put in 'em or behind 'em.  I'd probably thin the wall behind the windows so it wouldn't look like the car sides are three feet thick.

I suppose you could also use thin clear Styrene too, and scratch it up a bit just like the prototype.

Cheerio!
Bob Gilmore

OldEastRR

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2018, 05:02:44 PM »
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I read in MR once that using Blue Mettalic Flake on window surfaces looks like tinted glass in the shade. Maybe some darker metallic color would do for you.

cfritschle

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2018, 11:22:58 PM »
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John,

Did you know that Micro-Trains' next military vehicle will be a Humvee?
Carter

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John

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2018, 06:16:09 AM »
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John,

Did you know that Micro-Trains' next military vehicle will be a Humvee?

That's good to know .. since the one I got off Shapeways are crap :(

David K. Smith

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2018, 08:34:57 AM »
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FWIW, I've found that painting solid vehicle windows gloss black, dark gray or dark blue is the most effective.
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John

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2018, 08:38:01 AM »
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Thanks all .. these are going to be flat car loads -- so the 3 foot rule is probably good enough ..

Mark W

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2018, 11:39:18 AM »
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...the one I got off Shapeways are crap :(


Bummer.  There are a few decent looking Humvee's on Thingiverse.  Perhaps one of the Photonsters with the clear resin could give one a try. 

Otherwise, yes, gloss black.  I like to add a touch of silver to the mix too. 
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MarcVanCleven

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2018, 08:26:12 PM »
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Use a Number 2 Lead Pencil. Try to fill in the window evenly. Then gloss coat the widow.

Whenever I look at real vehicles, particularly trucks, vans and military vehicles the first thing I see the dark metallic sheen, and second the darkened compartment. After a lot of trial and error with paint and such, I found that a sharpened No 2 pencil lead works well, but adding a bit of gloss coat via a micro-brush works over the lead protects and evens the look.

Marc
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Roger Holmes

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2018, 09:19:11 PM »
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What Marc says about the No. 2 pencil.
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Roger

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Cajonpassfan

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2018, 11:27:02 AM »
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Use a Number 2 Lead Pencil. Try to fill in the window evenly. Then gloss coat the widow.

Whenever I look at real vehicles, particularly trucks, vans and military vehicles the first thing I see the dark metallic sheen, and second the darkened compartment. After a lot of trial and error with paint and such, I found that a sharpened No 2 pencil lead works well, but adding a bit of gloss coat via a micro-brush works over the lead protects and evens the look.

Marc
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Interesting idea, and simple. Do you have any pics?
Otto K.

thomasjmdavis

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2018, 12:04:27 PM »
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Use a Number 2 Lead Pencil. Try to fill in the window evenly. Then gloss coat the widow.

Whenever I look at real vehicles, particularly trucks, vans and military vehicles the first thing I see the dark metallic sheen, and second the darkened compartment. After a lot of trial and error with paint and such, I found that a sharpened No 2 pencil lead works well, but adding a bit of gloss coat via a micro-brush works over the lead protects and evens the look.

Marc
Capital City "N"Gineers
I tried this last night.  Brilliant.  I am a bit embarrassed that in 50+ years of modeling, I did not think of it myself. It won't replace clear windows, but best method so far to simulate glass on a solid surface.  Meets my 3' test, even with my bifocals on.
Tom D.

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SandyEggoJake

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2018, 01:00:04 PM »
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+1 for Marc's No 2. 

But for completeness sake, wanted to add if one cuts out and tries to install something glass like, I've been using Micro Mark's Micro Kristal Klear and "Gallery Glass" (16001) available at Micheal's.  Both work well (and in my hands, seem very similar but the later is cheaper) for adding small windshields to micron art PE brass cars.  Smallest length of no more than 3/16".  But of course the No2 pencil is not an option there. 

Got the Gallery Glass in part to find a way to use it to make scale stained glass.  Trying to get some color separation without physical leading lines.   Not happy with the stained glass results yet. 

 

randgust

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Re: Simulate glass
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2018, 11:31:48 AM »
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The most effective thing I've come up with so far is a mix of 50% Testors Enamel gloss black and 50% chrome silver.  Brush applied, then a thin coat of Crystal-Kleer over top.   It looks best on lighter-colored vehicles.    I like the graphite pencil idea though, because that's pretty darn close to what this does.