Author Topic: 3D CAD software  (Read 1633 times)

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rodsup9000

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3D CAD software
« on: November 10, 2018, 08:54:39 PM »
+1
 This is a list that I know about and some I've tried.



 Shetchup          Free            (pro about $700) was $450 when I bought it and this is what I use now. Great tutorials

 Freecad            Free             Have it downloaded but never used it.

  Tinkercad         Free             Very basic Tried it once

 Fusion 360       Free             The best out for free (educational use). As long as you use it for personal use only. You will have to keep it activated every year by checking the box for "personal use only"  Also has builtin CAM for CNC (Routers, mills and lathes).


 Solidworks       $$$$$$         Industry standard                              Educational program for veterans is $20. I used my DD214 and have the registration code, but could never get it downloaded to use it. May need to go back and try it again.



 Autocad          $$$$$            Industry standard


 There is a lot more out there, but these are the most popular ones I know about

 
Rodney

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C855B

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2018, 09:11:24 PM »
+1
I have been using IMSI TurboCAD Deluxe v4 and v10 (Mac) for a few simple Shapeways projects, and received notice today about a v11 upgrade sale. Don't know what the difference is between v11 and "2018", but I suppose the upgrade info will cover that. Free demo, $149 to buy. They have $$$$$ pro packages, but the cheapest "Deluxe" seems to do everything needed so far.

TurboCAD seems OK enough, but like @Mark W said in the other thread about CAD software in general, the learning curve is not quick. I do a small project, a few months go by before the next, and then discover I've forgotten half of what was learned the previous time. :|
...mike

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rodsup9000

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2018, 09:20:04 PM »
+1
  When I first started playing CNC machines, the first thing I was able to draw while watching the tutorials was this driver for a 20.3 DRGW C-16 that I later printed.  I was able to draw this within a half a hour of starting to use skechup.





 For me it is the simplest to CAD to use. As a general rule, I draw the piece in actual scale, but there has been times that sketchup will not draw something small enough and then I draw it twice the size and then reduce it by 50% in the CAM sofware. Sketchup does have a scaling tool, but never tried it yet.



Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
http://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=31585.0

rodsup9000

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2018, 09:24:05 PM »
+1
I have been using IMSI TurboCAD Deluxe v4 and v10 (Mac) for a few simple Shapeways projects, and received notice today about a v11 upgrade sale. Don't know what the difference is between v11 and "2018", but I suppose the upgrade info will cover that. Free demo, $149 to buy. They have $$$$$ pro packages, but the cheapest "Deluxe" seems to do everything needed so far.

TurboCAD seems OK enough, but like @Mark W said in the other thread about CAD software in general, the learning curve is not quick. I do a small project, a few months go by before the next, and then discover I've forgotten half of what was learned the previous time. :|

 Mike, this is the reason I've stuck with sketchup. And as Mark said about trying different ones, you got to forget about what you learned when you try something different.   That is why I'm afraid to something new.
Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
http://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=31585.0

Chris333

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2018, 09:25:06 PM »
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In Sketchup to scale something I just put a 1" long line somewhere. Then measure the line. It will say 1" and you type in the new size you want. When you're all done size that line back to 1".

With Sketchup pro. What types of CAD files can you import?

rodsup9000

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2018, 09:32:30 PM »
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With Sketchup pro. What types of CAD files can you import?

 .dwg, .dxf, .3ds, .dae, .ddf, .ifc, .kmz, .stl, .bmp, .jpg, .png, .pst, .tif, .tga,
Rodney

My Feather River Canyon in N-scale
http://www.therailwire.net/forum/index.php?topic=31585.0

C855B

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2018, 10:08:40 PM »
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Watch out for file format import/export claims. My experience so far is built-in conversions tend to break on complex artwork.

This, oddly enough, is a repeat of the same thing in the 2D world 30 years ago - format conversions between platforms were dicey at best. I was told by one vendor it was due to the "no reverse engineering" clauses in EULAs, where a competitor can't just go out and buy your software with the expectation of creating test files for their import engine. Development of converters has to be done in a so-called "clean room" setting.
...mike

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timwatson

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2018, 12:08:06 AM »
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I'll put this here since it seems more appropriate.

For those of you just getting started in 3D modeling try TinkerCad. It seems rudimentary but for teaching you 3D modeling techniques it is really great and anyone at any level can learn it. I’ve designed a whole 3D printer with it. There is no need for weird measurement measuring tools (sketchup). I make parts that are printed in increments of .1 mm in it.

It’s free it’s easy - it can get as complex as you need it to be. Oh and did I mention it’s all browser based no software to install.

https://tinkercad.com

You can make some pretty complex parts. This is the effector for my delta 3D printer I designed.
https://www.tinkercad.com/things/gSaT63q4Oo9
Tim Watson

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reinhardtjh

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2018, 12:43:08 AM »
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I have been using IMSI TurboCAD Deluxe v4 and v10 (Mac) for a few simple Shapeways projects, and received notice today about a v11 upgrade sale. Don't know what the difference is between v11 and "2018", but I suppose the upgrade info will cover that. Free demo, $149 to buy. They have $$$$$ pro packages, but the cheapest "Deluxe" seems to do everything needed so far.

TurboCAD seems OK enough, but like @Mark W said in the other thread about CAD software in general, the learning curve is not quick. I do a small project, a few months go by before the next, and then discover I've forgotten half of what was learned the previous time. :|

As I've mentioned elsewhere, I've been attempting to use ViaCAD for about 10 years starting with V5 through ViaCAD Pro V10.  Both ViaCAD and TurboCAD are based on the same CAD engine, Spatial Inc's ACIS 3D Modeling engine.  It looks like Punch/Encore (the current owners of ViaCAD) has just released V11 of the various flavors (ViaCAD 2D/3D, Pro, Shark and Shark Pro).  If the follow their usual marketing, they will probably have a holiday deal of 20% off. They also have upgrade pricing and discounts if you have other CAD licenses to trade.

ViaCAD has trial versions that you can register for from the various products order page.  I couldn't find any info on duration or limitations.

ViaCAD -->  https://www.punchcad.com

New user prices for ViaCAD Pro (probably the minimum version for doing 3D printing) is $499.99  up from previous versions.  Upgrades run as low as $149.99.  ViaCAD runs on both Windows and Mac platforms.

Also available is Rhinocerous CAD.  It's fairly well known among the CAD/CAM milling machine folks for it's Windows 3D CAD and CAM product.  A few years ago, after a long development, they released a macOS version of the then current V5.  V6 has since come out for Windows with the Mac sometime in the future.  I bought the beta based on it's popularity and was upgraded to the release version.  Again, I haven't made any progress.  One of these days.

Rhino has 90-day trial verisons for both macOS and Windows.  These are full versions with all the features enabled, they just die after 90 days.

https://www.rhino3d.com/
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wcfn100

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2018, 01:19:36 AM »
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I'll suggest people try Autodesk Fusion 360.  It's a parametric modeler (meaning you can go back on a model and change parameters).  There is a 30 free trial and it's free for a year if you qualify as a startup company or just a hobbyist.  I've been trying to find out what happens after a year and it looks like as long as you still qualify, you get another free year license.

Jason

Mark W

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2018, 02:57:34 AM »
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Mike, this is the reason I've stuck with sketchup. And as Mark said about trying different ones, you got to forget about what you learned when you try something different.   That is why I'm afraid to something new.

I didn't mean it to be discouraging to explore your options.  So long as you keep those differences in mind when venturing out.  Worst case, you're on the verge of things 'clicking' then give up, simply because you mistake a minor action with a different program. 

I do know that several top MRR designers from shapeways have used Sketchup.  @HuskerN did all of his trucks in Sketchup if I recall correctly, and I believe @Baldylox is a Sketchup guru too. 
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Mark W

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2018, 03:05:25 AM »
+1
In Sketchup to scale something I just put a 1" long line somewhere. Then measure the line. It will say 1" and you type in the new size you want. When you're all done size that line back to 1".

With Sketchup pro. What types of CAD files can you import?

Please, please, PLEASE.  Everyone.  Make life easier for yourself and use METRIC!!!
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Chris333

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2018, 03:25:23 AM »
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Please, please, PLEASE.  Everyone.  Make life easier for yourself and use METRIC!!!

Oh yeah the slicer software only seems to work in metric. Me well I just don't know metric. Every time I see something in metric I run it through a converter because I know what .063" is in my head and all the numbers we punch into machines at work all day is in inches as well.

Chris333

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2018, 03:37:48 AM »
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.dwg, .dxf, .3ds, .dae, .ddf, .ifc, .kmz, .stl, .bmp, .jpg, .png, .pst, .tif, .tga,

OK so just now I made a 1" square box in AutoCAD saved as a .dwg and imported it to Sketchup. The 1" square shows up in Sketchup, but then what? It seems I have to trace over that same square to make it active in Sketchup to be able to push/pull it.

BTW about a year ago I didn't know anything about Sketchup so I'm still learning. Now I can at least do stuff like this:

Still have no idea how to make a rivet. For one the dia is always too small for Sketchup and I have no idea how to dome it. I draw small diamonds (rotated squares) and pull them. Since they are so small you can't really tell once printed.


This is 2 HOn30 flatcars I drew:

Chris333

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Re: 3D CAD software
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2018, 04:45:27 AM »
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OK so just now I made a 1" square box in AutoCAD saved as a .dwg and imported it to Sketchup. The 1" square shows up in Sketchup, but then what? It seems I have to trace over that same square to make it active in Sketchup to be able to push/pull it.



You know what. Maybe a better question would be how do I import an image to Sketchup. When I put a scale drawing into AutoCAD it is still to scale, but in Sketchup it wants me to make it a size. I could just skip the whole AutoCAD thing if I can get it into Sketchup.