Author Topic: How did I do  (Read 1027 times)

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eja

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How did I do
« on: September 09, 2018, 05:02:37 PM »
+4
I decided to see if I could weather a car to create the "look and feel" of this one:



and I ended up with this :














Comments, criticisms and suggestion for improvement welcome ...

RBrodzinsky

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2018, 05:03:43 PM »
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Looks great, to me!
Rick Brodzinsky
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draskouasshat

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2018, 05:15:22 PM »
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you might try a rusty wash down the sides if youd like to add more rust to the sides but it looks great!!
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seusscaboose

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2018, 06:39:55 PM »
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Needs to be dirtier
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Albersala

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2018, 06:46:21 PM »
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I also think it should be a bit dirtier but in general I think you've done a great job.

mmagliaro

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2018, 07:04:27 PM »
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I think it is very good overall. 

What I would suggest is that the amount of dirt and rust should be greater in the bottom half and lower edges of the car.  That's how the prototype looks,  and this is a more natural look because everything "flows downhill".

I would try to add more dirt/rust in the lower half.  Otherwise, great job!

eja

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2018, 08:26:45 PM »
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Thanks all ... would you recommend I add dirt by using more dark washes or powders ?

peteski

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2018, 08:37:57 PM »
+1
I'm not weathering expert, but comparing the 1:1 photo to yours, there isn't enough downward vertical streaking on your model.  Dirt and rust stains naturally flow down.  Some of your weathering seems to be applied vertically, but then there are other spots on the sides, and especially at the end ribs, where it looks like your brown/rust washes just puddled up on the flat surfaces and dried that way.

I know weathering is hard to do correctly and so far I suck at it myself.  I recently bought  :tommann: weathering book and took a quick look in it.  The photography is excellent, but he doesn't seem to get very deep into exact techniques which will produce the excellent results he gets.  I know that weathering is an art form where some people are better than others, but having some step-by-step instructions and photos woudl be very helpful to those (like me) who struggle with realistic weathering.
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Kentuckian

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2018, 09:47:34 PM »
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I would try powders on the bottom, but practice on something from the spares bin first. I’m just getting into powders myself.
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NorsemanJack

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2018, 01:57:58 AM »
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I think you did a great job!

eja

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2018, 06:00:52 PM »
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I debated with myself regarding whether or not to put this weathering attempt "out there" for comment.  I am glad I did as I have learned a few thing.

Most notably, the effect at looking at a model in the larger than life photo.  I was almost ready to post the pictures last week when I discoverer that on both sides of the car, I had done nothing to the panel closed to the car end  :o.  I have heard others previously comment regarding seeing things in a photo that ther had completely overlook on the model itself.

Also photo related, the car appears, to me, darker in "real life" that it looks in the photos.  Still deciding if I should add more dirt and rust towards the bottom. 

Again, thanks all for the comments.

ed

peteski

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2018, 06:44:36 PM »
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Most notably, the effect at looking at a model in the larger than life photo.  I was almost ready to post the pictures last week when I discoverer that on both sides of the car, I had done nothing to the panel closed to the car end  :o.  I have heard others previously comment regarding seeing things in a photo that ther had completely overlook on the model itself.


Yes, examining closeup photos of a model is very helpful in discovering all sorts of flaws one visible when the model is viewed in-person.  Macro photography is a great modeling tool.  :)  Examining the model under magnification (wearing an Optivisor or a similar device) and under strong light is also quite helpful, but photos are even better.
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Steveruger45

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Re: How did I do
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2018, 08:26:33 PM »
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I debated with myself regarding whether or not to put this weathering attempt "out there" for comment.  I am glad I did as I have learned a few thing.

Most notably, the effect at looking at a model in the larger than life photo.  I was almost ready to post the pictures last week when I discoverer that on both sides of the car, I had done nothing to the panel closed to the car end  :o.  I have heard others previously comment regarding seeing things in a photo that ther had completely overlook on the model itself.

Also photo related, the car appears, to me, darker in "real life" that it looks in the photos.  Still deciding if I should add more dirt and rust towards the bottom. 

Again, thanks all for the comments.

ed

I think you did a great job.
This is an aspect of the hobby I have yet to venture into so I don’t even know yet if I suck at it or not yet.  It takes some courage to first attempt this on your prize models.  Practicing on models you don’t care too much about I guess helps but I don’t have any of those, they are all my prize models.
Anyhow, thanks for posting and all the others too for their input, Which I find encouraging.
Steve
Atascocita, Texas