Author Topic: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company  (Read 4730 times)

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glakedylan

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #30 on: January 15, 2018, 11:53:27 PM »
0
sorry this happened
i can identify with the context
i hope you are able to get the medical help you need
take best of care
sincerely
Gary
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and all may care for each..."

peteski

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2018, 01:33:25 AM »
0
Sorry to hear about your accident DKS.

According to the strange and fascinating history of cynoacrylate, that was one of its first commercial uses. It was actually sold to MASH units for that purpose.

Yes, quoting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanoacrylate (the entire page is an interesting read)

CA glue was in veterinary use for mending bone, hide, and tortoise shell by the early 1970s or before. Harry Coover said in 1966 that a CA spray was used in the Vietnam War to reduce bleeding in wounded soldiers until they could be brought to a hospital. n-Butyl cyanoacrylate has been used medically since the 1970s. In the US, due to its potential to irritate the skin, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not approve its use as a medical adhesive until 1998 with Dermabond.[11] Studies confirm that cyanoacrylate can be safer and more functional for wound closure than traditional suturing (stitches). The adhesive is superior in time required to close wounds, incidence of infection (suture canals through the skin's epidermal, dermal, and subcutaneous fat layers introduce extra routes of contamination), and final cosmetic appearance.
. . .
While standard "superglue" is 100% ethyl cyanoacrylate, many custom formulations (e.g., 91% ECA, 9% poly(methyl methacrylate), <0.5% hydroquinone, and a small amount of organic sulfonic acid,[17] and variations on the compound n-butyl-cyanoacrylate for medical applications[12]) have come to be used for specific applications. There are 3 cyanoacrylate compounds currently available as topical skin adhesives. 2-Octyl-cyanoacrylate is marketed as Dermabond and SurgiSeal. n-2-Butyl-cyanoacrylate is marketed as Histoacryl, Indermil, GluStitch, GluSeal, PeriAcryl, and LiquiBand. The compound 2-Ethyl-cyanoacrylate is available as Epiglu.[18]

« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 01:35:22 AM by peteski »
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #32 on: January 16, 2018, 09:54:32 AM »
+3
I decided to return to work on this project sooner rather than later. Obviously things are very slow-going, but it serves as a better way to pass the time than just sitting around moaning.

First, I addressed the four-section extension, which is where I injured myself. I carefully finished making the brick strips that join the end wall center blanks together.



After assembling the wall, I noticed the mistake I made in the third section, which should have had a freight door, so I broke that part out and corrected it, adding a piece of .080" Evergreen I-beam. I trimmed the reassembled wall to height, then filled in the window openings with bits cut from Walthers' State Line Farm Supply end walls. The small window openings are sized for Grandt Line 8-pane horizontal windows.



Then I switched back to the three-section extension. After trimming the wall to its final size, I filled in the window openings with bits cut from Walthers' State Line Farm Supply end walls. Again, the smaller window openings are sized for Grandt Line 8-pane horizontal windows.

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Dave V

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #33 on: January 16, 2018, 10:50:28 AM »
+2
Dave, you clearly have a host of talents, but the one I’m perhaps most in awe of is your ability to see structural elements within seemingly unrelated kits.  I’m still wowed that the Lewistown depot you built for me sits literally across the street from my Walthers Water Street Freight Station from which it was built, but none of my visitors have ever realized that on their own.  They’re always equally surprised when I tell them where the depot walls and tower come from.
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #34 on: January 16, 2018, 11:13:52 AM »
+4
Thank you, Dave, but I think you're managing to do the very same yourself. Your modeling challenge entry demonstrates that ability, using a station kit for a mill.

It's really quite simple. I just buy lots and lots of kits, almost never for the purpose of building the "intended" structures. When I get the kits, the first thing I do is break the sprues apart and toss all of the parts into a big box. After a while, I forget their intended purpose, and just see them as raw materials for making what I need. I call the process "scratch-bashing."
"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #35 on: January 17, 2018, 10:57:01 AM »
+1
The sheet metal addition above the first brick extension vexed me for some time. While I had the perfect starting material (a chunk of the Vulcan kit roof), I didn't look forward to making the window openings, as my skills have diminished—a matter made much worse by my injury.



Then I took a closer look at the reference image: there's a horizontal seam running right through the window openings, just a little above center. I could "model" this by making two wall parts, each having notches cut for the windows, and using a sheet of paper as a shim to offset the parts slightly when joining them. Notches are infinitely easier to make than square openings by simply making a series of parallel cuts with the table saw, and cleaning up the opening with a knife. The openings are sized for Grandt Line 6/6 double-hung windows.



While studying this problem, I also noticed another mistake I'd made: this section has no brick pilasters on the ends, so I trimmed them off before making the vertical extension, then joined the wall parts together with the second extension.

"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #36 on: January 17, 2018, 11:02:20 AM »
+3


After much consideration, I've elected to end the building at the second extension, leaving off the third extension at the far right. The principal reason for this decision came after I began assembling the walls I'd completed up to this point, and felt that the last extension would make the overall building a bit too large for potential use on a layout. The secondary reason was that I'd not arrived at a satisfactory means to model the plain brick extension. I could have made it similar to the section to its left, but the size issue became the ruling factor. Thus I'll need make a "pretend" end wall for the right end of the building. I've decided to make it brick, similar in style to the end of the main section.

 
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 11:09:31 AM by David K. Smith »
"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2018, 05:05:16 PM »
+3
Well, it certainly has been a while since I touched this project; been distracted by a lot of ugly real-life stuff. Basically, life sucks, then it sucks some more. To help slow my declining mental health, I went back to work on the modeling challenge.



The back end of the main structure has a small single-story extension. After I bashed these walls together, I rebuilt the end wall of the main building when I noticed that the real one has a small decorative window near the peak. I used the original Vulcan center wall part to add this touch, and repeated it on the extension end wall as well, even though in real life this wall is quite different. (The misalignment of the center windows doesn't matter, since they'll all be covered up by the extension.)



The extension side wall that faces the street (lower right, above) was cobbled together from various scraps; it's not faithful to the real one, but it captures the feeling. The side wall opposite this is covered by yet another extension out back, so it will be plain styrene. Meanwhile, I discovered that Grandt Line 20/20 enginehouse windows, when cut in half, were a decent fit for the large end wall window openings; a small styrene shim on each side was all that's needed to make it work.



With all of the main building walls cut and pasted, I proceeded to fill in the window openings as needed, so I could install the new windows and begin assembling the walls.



Some of the window fillers are white, so they don't show up in these images.



« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 05:11:25 PM by David K. Smith »
"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #38 on: February 14, 2018, 08:43:14 AM »
+6
Assembly of the main building began once I had all of the walls completed, including the installation of windows and doors (I determined that it was impractical to attempt to finish them separately and drop them in after the building was painted). The walls came together quite quickly.





"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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Philip H

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #39 on: February 14, 2018, 09:10:21 AM »
0
That looks fabulous.
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Lemosteam

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #40 on: February 14, 2018, 09:59:07 AM »
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No pics for me at all after several refreshes.

wm3798

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #41 on: February 14, 2018, 10:12:27 AM »
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I love the mish mash of styles and parts.  Very typical of an older northeastern industrial building.
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chicken45

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #42 on: February 14, 2018, 03:34:28 PM »
0
Did you shop the building on a picture of your hand? The edges of the building make look like it was layered on. Nothing wrong with that, or course, but the illusion has me curious.

Also looks great! Love the step by step pictures.
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David K. Smith

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2018, 05:02:02 PM »
+1
Did you shop the building on a picture of your hand? The edges of the building make look like it was layered on. Nothing wrong with that, or course, but the illusion has me curious.

Also looks great! Love the step by step pictures.

Nope, not shopped. I think the reason it looks a little "off" is because the building is actually balanced on my fingertips, and the front edge is floating above the heel of my hand, so it doesn't cast a shadow. Also, the light was very diffuse, further reducing any shadows. Glad you like the build.
"Life's a piece of sh!t when you look at it."
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peteski

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Re: E.J. Scudder Foundry & Machine Company
« Reply #44 on: February 14, 2018, 05:21:45 PM »
0
Great choice of structure to model, and excellent modeling! Good to see DKS "going at it" again.
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