Author Topic: Péniche or Spits Barge in N and Z Scale  (Read 488 times)

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pnolan48

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Péniche or Spits Barge in N and Z Scale
« on: January 04, 2018, 03:24:06 PM »
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A péniche (or spits in Dutch) is a steel motorized inland waterway barge of up to 350 tonnes' capacity. Péniche barges were built to fit the post-1880s French waterways and the locks of Freycinet gauge.

They are 38.50 m (126 ft) long and 5.05 m (16.6 ft) wide. The specification is still applied for commercial navigation as Class I in the Classification of European Inland Waterways. By 2001, 5,800 km (3,604 mi) of navigable waterways in France corresponded to the Freycinet gauge, accounting for 23% of waterborne traffic. (from Wikipedia).

While not an American prototype, these can seen on some smaller waterways in cities here in the US.



In N scale they are 9.45” long and 1.25” wide. The Z scale models are 72.727% of those dimensions, or 6.9” by 0.9” wide. Two cabin configuration are included. See more details at https://nscaleships.com/n-z-scale-ship-index/peniche-or-spits-barge-in-n-and-z-scale/

Lemosteam

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Re: Péniche or Spits Barge in N and Z Scale
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2018, 09:03:04 PM »
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@pnolan48 Me Likey!

Were these used on the east coast at all? I think I have a great spot, but it does look Euro.

pnolan48

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Re: Péniche or Spits Barge in N and Z Scale
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2018, 11:05:01 PM »
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John,

Plausible along the smaller rivers. More urban (especially Chicago) but plausible in Baltimore or Philadelphia or even Boston. Usually, depending on era, you've got a small tug pushing a small barge. But these small self-powered barges are showing up more frequently these days. I saw them in Boston Harbor ten years ago as I was taking the Salem to Boston ferry. I think they were trash hauling barges. They are economical in Europe and are making their way to the US. Soem of them can motor along pretty fast.