Author Topic: NYC Hudson Valley Lines  (Read 3097 times)

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Brian M

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Re: NYC Hudson Valley Lines
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2018, 12:06:45 PM »
+5
Time for an update.  Nothing too sexy, unless of course empty wood frames and chunks of foam do it for you.  :P

I recently finished off the frame for the blob end loop.  Kind of looks like it could be the start of a small Star Destroyer or something...  This is 49" wide in order to accommodate two mainline tracks of roughly 21" and 22.5", give or take a half inch.  Kind of depends on what I end up doing for the little strip of scenery between the edge of the layout and the outside track.  I want to be sure there's room to prevent equipment from taking a big dive off the layout should a derailment happen.




One night I had some company while working with the garage door open.  I tried to get him to help out, but he just twitched an antenna at me.


During the last work session I hosted, two of my friends helped get two sectional frames built, one straight forward rectangular one (24" by 60"), and one funky corner (in the foreground, that's kind of 24" wide by 40-ish inches long).


Finally, this past weekend I was able to build an "X" style frame.  This will minimize the length of the 2 foot wide isle width near the end loop, and let the isle expand back out to 3 feet.


And I started to get foam on the two module frames (I still need to fill in the gap along the right side where the modules meet).


-Brian.

Brian M

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Re: NYC Hudson Valley Lines
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2018, 11:06:57 AM »
+1
More end loop progress.

I cut the foam for the end loop with a handy compass made out of a piece of Masonite, and with my knife in one end, I was able to make multiple passes through the foam, pulling on the Masonite to drag the knife blade along.




Which gave me a nice finished edge in a perfect half circle:


And here it is once I glued the foam onto the wood frame and got it set up on the benchwork:


I've also been spending time this past weekend adding some shelves to the benchwork under the endloop so that I can store my magazines.  Which will give the added bonus of stabilizing the end of the peninsula with all the weight.

-Brian.

Carolina Northern

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Re: NYC Hudson Valley Lines
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2018, 03:45:36 PM »
0
Nice solution to a common problem.

Dave V

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Re: NYC Hudson Valley Lines
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2018, 03:59:32 PM »
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I did the same for the peninsula for my RGS.
Silver San Juan Scenic Line

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Brian M

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Re: NYC Hudson Valley Lines
« Reply #34 on: August 08, 2018, 06:54:15 PM »
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I'm still in the process of getting the track plan created in XTrackCAD, and transferring what I have envisioned in my mind into a track plan that I can share with people.  But one thing that I have also worked on to help guide my thinking is creating a basic track plan via "line art" in good 'ole Powerpoint (the design tool most favored by engineers everywhere  :P).  This process has helped me think about what tracks are important to consider for the various towns and industries.  I'm not taking the approach of trying to model this as a true 4 track mainline, since that would require more staging yard space than one could ever hope to have and more equipment than I could ever buy and just more work than it is worth.  This is more like a 2 track mainline with spots of 4 tracks where either there were actually 6 tracks (such as the area north of Spuyten Duyvil) or where the scene might look a little off with just 2 tracks (such as passing through Garrison where 2 tracks duck into a tunnel and 2 tracks pass around the outside of the tunnel).  Of course, the vast majority of the Hudson Division has been a 2 track mainline for so long that most people probably wouldn't flinch at seeing just 2 tracks pass through Garrison, but where it makes sense, I still want to project the image of late 40's mainline railroading along the New York Central.

So I thought I'd share the line art version of the track plan that I've developed so far.  There are spots where since I knew I wasn't going to model all 4 (or 6) mainline tracks, I didn't include them in my drawing.  Also, there were a lot more tracks within the Standard Brands complex, so I might add more to what I've got so far, depending on how the actual space limitations work out with that spot on the layout.

Working from north to south, we have Garrison:


Peekskill:


Standard Brands:


Croton-Harmon:


and Spuyten Duyvil:



Obviously Croton-Harmon is greatly reduced from the prototype, but that complex was so vast, I never intended on trying to model it to any level of detail.  Mostly I want to offer the operational interest of the freight yard and the mail and express cars coming on and off some of the passenger trains.  And finally, the big piece of what's currently missing from here is the main freight yard at what I'm calling "72nd St Yard".  I'll eventually get to it, but I've been having a difficult time trying to figure out how to design the yard on paper to include all the aspects I desire.  I think it will evolve over time as I play around with track arrangements in the part of the room that will contain the yard.

-Brian.