Author Topic: NCE EB1  (Read 780 times)

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LIRR

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NCE EB1
« on: November 03, 2017, 01:11:14 PM »
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I have these mounted on the underside of the bench work, I'd like to add a remote status light to the terminals provided for such. anything special required? any recommendation would be appreciated....

Point353

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Re: NCE EB1
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 10:00:23 PM »
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I have these mounted on the underside of the bench work, I'd like to add a remote status light to the terminals provided for such. anything special required? any recommendation would be appreciated....
According to the manual, the remote status light output is 5V with a 300Ω series current limiting resistor.
Given a typical forward voltage drop (VF) of ~2V for a red LED, any LED with sufficient brightness for your situation at a forward operating current (IF) of ~10mA will work.
https://ncedcc.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/article_attachments/200499389/EB1v1.pdf

LIRR

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Re: NCE EB1
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2017, 09:54:06 AM »
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Where do I get such a thing?...I am electronically illiterate

jdcolombo

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Re: NCE EB1
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2017, 10:33:52 AM »
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Where do I get such a thing?...I am electronically illiterate

To translate that to English, it means that basically any 3mm or 5mm round red LED will work.  Most LEDs run at 20ma, not 10ma, so the question is whether it would be bright enough for you, but it probably would - most LEDs don't vary much in their light output between 10ma and 20ma.  I don't know why they used a 3000-ohm dropping resistor for a 5v circuit; 1K would have been plenty for nearly any commercial LED at 5v. 

The real question is how you would like to mount the LED.  If you want a nice finished look with a chrome bezel, try one of these to see if it is bright enough for you.  You'll probably have to attach wires from the leads on the LED assembly to the EB1, and remember that LEDs can only be wired one way; if you wire it and it doesn't light up, reverse the wires.

https://www.allelectronics.com/item/ind-15r/5mm-red-led-indicator-assembly/1.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1era846l1wIVhx6GCh0qMQQzEAQYAiABEgLDA_D_BwE

John C.

LIRR

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Re: NCE EB1
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2017, 11:35:03 AM »
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Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for, a source for this stuff....

peteski

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Re: NCE EB1
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2017, 12:40:02 PM »
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With modern LED technology, 10mA usually is good enough to produce fairly bright light. I still have some red LEDs from the mid-70s which were not very bright at even 20mA.
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