Author Topic: Best Of Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set  (Read 14689 times)

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pmpexpress

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Re: Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set
« Reply #195 on: October 06, 2018, 12:09:25 AM »
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Pete,

Thanks for posting this additional information.

Took another look at the prototype images that I acquired from the Internet and found none of the aircraft photographed had eyebrow windows or retrofitted plugs.

All of the images depicted as delivered aircraft with smooth metal over the cockpit windows.

Wonder how the eyebrow windows were covered during rail transport?

White coverings fastened down with yellow tape?

If you elected to model a 737-300 fuselage, adding the eyebrow windows would definitively confirm which aircraft was being transported and what the era was.

This topic needs further exploration.

By the way, the photos you posted have some nice shots of the forward fuselage doors.

As seen in the prototype photo that Mark uploaded in reply #97, it would be nice to have the door outlines with the yellow tape and coverings over the round windows added to the new Micro-Trains decal sheet.


pmpexpress

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Re: Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set
« Reply #196 on: October 06, 2018, 12:14:58 AM »
+1
I just noticed something new on the brushguards in my video.  While I was running my J Train on the Free-moN layout at the NTS back in August, I met an upper-mid level woman that works at BNSF, and closely with the fuselage trains.  She shared a lot of cool insights, for instance once a fuselage is delivered apparently they start a clock for that fuselage counting down until the first passenger steps on board.  Airlines sell tickets long before the aircraft is built, and if there are any delays in delivery and building, that means cancelled flights.

Another thing she said is that they are well on their way in equipping every brushguard with cameras.  In my video, you can see all three units have them.  The pelican case at the base of the brushguard holds all the electronics, and there are two holes cut out in the top corners of the guard facing the fuselage.  It used to be (still is?) if a fuselage arrives with any scratch or scruff in the green paint, the entire unit is scrapped.  Now with the recording, they can go back and see exactly when, where, and what caused it.  Imagine being the guy with that job...

After rereading the posts in this thread, I noticed that heyrob previously uploaded (in reply #25) an image of a prototype brush guard that was fitted with high def cameras.


peteski

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Re: Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set
« Reply #197 on: October 06, 2018, 01:47:06 AM »
+1
Pete,

Thanks for posting this additional information.

Took another look at the prototype images that I acquired from the Internet and found none of the aircraft photographed had eyebrow windows or retrofitted plugs.

All of the images depicted as delivered aircraft with smooth metal over the cockpit windows.

Wonder how the eyebrow windows were covered during rail transport?

White coverings fastened down with yellow tape?

If you elected to model a 737-300 fuselage, adding the eyebrow windows would definitively confirm which aircraft was being transported and what the era was.

This topic needs further exploration.

By the way, the photos you posted have some nice shots of the forward fuselage doors.

As seen in the prototype photo that Mark uploaded in reply #97, it would be nice to have the door outlines with the yellow tape and coverings over the round windows added to the new Micro-Trains decal sheet.


In the photos I collected over the years there are many variations of how the windows, doors and other parts of the fuselage were protected.

Here are some older photos with eyebrows windows.








And for something completely different, this photo shows that the emergency exit doors are not installed and are covered with plugs, and the main wing spar (or fuel tank?) is covered with clear plastic (with the BOEING logo visible inside).  Like I said, there are lots of variations.  Since the fuselages didn't have the darker green coating I assume they are form some time back.





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pmpexpress

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Re: Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set
« Reply #198 on: October 06, 2018, 04:42:28 AM »
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In the photos I collected over the years there are many variations of how the windows, doors and other parts of the fuselage were protected.

Here are some older photos with eyebrows windows.







And for something completely different, this photo shows that the emergency exit doors are not installed and are covered with plugs, and the main wing spar (or fuel tank?) is covered with clear plastic (with the BOEING logo visible inside).  Like I said, there are lots of variations.  Since the fuselages didn't have the darker green coating I assume they are form some time back.



Pete,

Have never seen any of these photos before.

With some black paint and some of the yellow striping from the Micro-Trains decal set, it appears that simulating the covered up eyebrow windows should be fairly easy.

Along with the lighter colored fuselage coatings, there appear to be some black and green covered cockpit window coverings and black nose cone mount coverings.

In addition, the older style lettering, the Plate F markings, and the lack of the large yellow safety stripes on the 89' fuselage flats is indicative of the early 2000 and pre-Y2K BNSF fuselage flatcar paint schemes.

The clear plastic covering the wing mounts is neat.

These coverings could probably be simulated with custom decals.

So many variations...

So little time and money...

Added to my own collection, thanks for sharing the images.

heyrob

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Re: Detailing the Micro-Trains BNSF Fuselage Set
« Reply #199 on: February 11, 2019, 02:00:30 AM »
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Another thing she said is that they are well on their way in equipping every brushguard with cameras.  In my video, you can see all three units have them.  The pelican case at the base of the brushguard holds all the electronics, and there are two holes cut out in the top corners of the guard facing the fuselage.  It used to be (still is?) if a fuselage arrives with any scratch or scruff in the green paint, the entire unit is scrapped.  Now with the recording, they can go back and see exactly when, where, and what caused it.  Imagine being the guy with that job...

Hi Mark, too bad I didn't remember you were part of this thread when we met in Salt Lake City last June. Anyway I haven't been on here since well before then, and just now saw this above quote. If the BNSF gal said that if a fuselage has a "scratch or scruff in the green paint, the entire unit is scrapped." She's sorely mistaken! I used to work in the same building and about 300 feet from where the fuselages are unloaded from the rail cars, and I can assure you that even dents or bullet holes are not enough to result in the scrapping of a fuselage. The panels affected are removed and replaced, just like if your car is damaged, you fix the damage, not scrap the whole car. I was still working for Boeing when the derailment of the MRL train that sent several fuselages down an embankment and into the river, and even those were evaluated for repair/scrap determination, but it turned out that by the time they were pulled back up the embankment, all had suffered too much structural damage to economically repair. I wonder how she got the idea that even scratches would cause the fuselage to be scrapped.

I've seen a number of your recent FB posts lately, looking forward to seeing you again in SLC this summer.