Author Topic: East Tennessee & Western North Carolina RR ("The Tweetsie") branchline in On30  (Read 15948 times)

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p51

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    • Stoney Creek Branch of the ET&WNC, in On30
Well, the Grindstaff store project is DONE, finished last night. I added grass all around the concrete base for the room supports and pump, some bushes and weeds along the bottom edge of the entire building, two figures standing outside (Mr. Grindstaff himself looking in the direction of the tracks and another guy looking at him), and then I painted some new and old oil splotches in several spots on the small concrete base, as well as new and older bird poop on the roof. I continued the oil spills to the gravel, roughly where you’d expect to see cars sitting at the pumps, facing either direction, and trailing off toward Stoney Creek Road. As the gravel lot needed more randomness, I sprinkled some ground up leaves and some random small debris especially on the outside edges as you’d expect. It’s now no longer a consistent monochrome surface.


I started this project with a simple sketch when the pandemic started, in April, and it almost feels weird that it’s actually done. I’m so glad I did this as the pre-built structure that was sitting there never looked ‘right’ to me. I had a blast working on this and now I’m thinking of another project. Maybe a small shack that has burned after being hit by lighting?
 :?

Ed Kapuscinski

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That building looks fantastic!

p51

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    • Stoney Creek Branch of the ET&WNC, in On30
On the original store I used for inspiration (a couple of photos of the store at Carter, TN, back when it was made of wood, in the 30s), there was a two-sided Texaco sign facing toward traffic on the road. It was connected to the roof and I didn’t want to re-create that as it hung from chains from a thin metal bracket, something that could be easily damaged when taking off the roof to show off the interior. So, I later found a photo of a pre-war shepherd crook style sign pole, and I recreated that with the wire from a coat hanger (it took a few tries to get the shape somewhat correct).
I was pondering how to frame the signs on to the pole, as the real one used turnbuckles or metal brackets. After using a grinder bit to cut off the ends, I wondered how I was going to attach the sign into the center.  Then, as I was throwing away a soda can it just hit me has an epiphany.
I cut the shape out the side of a Doctor Pepper can, glued it in place with ACC, and spray painted the whole thing black.
After blasting the whole thing with black spray paint and then dull coat, I just glued the signs into place, and test fit it onto the layout. Afterward, I weathered it with dry brushing and some light washes.

While the brackets aren’t perfect, only an expert on 1930s Texaco signs would know that by looking. I like how it turned out.

And here I am a few days earlier, enjoying running trains (thanks to my long-suffering wife, Jennette, for the shot):


p51

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    • Stoney Creek Branch of the ET&WNC, in On30
I shot this video late last night, on my third attempt, just to show what I’d been up to and for those who have just seen the layout through still photos. It was all in one take, so when my phone booted me off near (but not at) very end of it, I didn't bother shooting it yet again:

p51

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Here we go, my newest project. A while back, someone uploaded color movie film from Hampton, Tennessee during what it labelled as taken during the fall of 1940. Sadly, I looked up the Vimeo video and can’t find it there now. I’m glad I screen saved a few shots from it. In this film, they showed a few Carter County school busses heading back to Elizabethton from a football game. They were 1939 Dodge truck fronts with what have to be custom bus bodies.




Sadly, nobody makes a ’39 Dodge truck in O scale, so I had to find something that could be used as a representation. My scratch-building skills to create the bus body (with all its compound curves) are nowhere up to the task. So, I had to compromise there, too. I’m going to use a Russian GAZ bus body, grafted onto the front of another maker’s truck front end.

I’m going to grind off the nose of the truck from the firewall, do the same to the bus body and graft them together.
After that, I’ll shorten the truck frame to match the wheelbase for the finished body and mount it onto the shortened truck frame. It’ll then be painted in yellow, and I’ll make my own decals as I have a typeface very close to the original busses already prepared for the decals.
The irony here is that I model the summer of 1943, so a school bus doing anything doesn’t make a great deal of sense, though I assume they did get used in the summer for moving people around as needed?

Hawghead

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Lee,

I think you could simplify scratch building the bus body by just using a solid block of balsa for the roof.  Cut it to the needed length and width of the body and thick enough for the height from the top of the body sides to the top of the roof.  Then I think you could carve and sand the contours fairly easily.

Scott
There's a prototype for everything.
If you can't make it perfect, make it adjustable.
DCC is not plug-n-play.

p51

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    • Stoney Creek Branch of the ET&WNC, in On30
I’ve been experimenting with some photos after changing the structure I use to represent smoke from locomotives in photos. It had been covered in cotton balls, but now I stretched foam pillow stuffing over it and painted it black. I’m just playing around trying to determine the best way to represent smoke with it, as it looks great in person.
In this shot, ET&WNC # 12 brings water car WC2 (formerly the tender of now-scrapped Stoney Creek Southern RR locomotive #2) slowly past the Unaka Company barrel plant at Winner, TN

And here, #9 brings passenger coach 23 around the curve at Sadie, TN. Photographer Clarence Ilyankoff watches through the lens of his Speed Graphic camera:

I will be doing more experiments to best show the smoke.

p51

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A couple more recent shots: