Author Topic: Work area lighting.  (Read 1280 times)

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craigolio1

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Work area lighting.
« on: February 09, 2017, 04:43:27 PM »
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 I can't think of where else to post it. I'm working on my train room now, drywall goes in soon, and I need to install a light fixture above my workbench. Right now it's a lightbulb with a chain. What's the best light for working under?

 The rest of the room has fluorescent fixtures but I haven't chosen about it.

 To me it kind of makes sense to have the same lighting that you would be operating under so that any paint work I do doesn't change when I put my models on the layout. However my layout will have valances with LED lighting under them.  It's unlikely the colour will match perfectly with what over my workbench anyway.

I workbench is in a bit of an alcove and it would look funny to put another fluorescent fixture above it so I was thinking of just putting a regular recessed fixture with the flood bulb in it.

 What are your thoughts?

Thanks, Craig
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 08:05:47 PM by craigolio1 »

Philip H

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2017, 04:58:24 PM »
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Craig,
The consensus in threads like this seems to be get as close to your layout lighting as possible with respect to lumens, light color/temperature and fixtures. That said I think it's also important to have more light on your workbench the the layout especially if you are workin in N scale. Easy to loose those small parts if you have dark corners.
Philip H.
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ednadolski

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2017, 05:02:45 PM »
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What's the best light for working under?

I have two of these on my workbench that I picked up from the local Costco:

http://products.ottlite.com/p-456-led-bluetooth-speaker-lamp.aspx

The light level is adjustable, and the speakers are not bad either.   If you install daylight LEDs on your layout valances then the colors should match fairly well.

Ed

craigolio1

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2017, 10:26:20 PM »
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 Awesome. Daylight it is. Thank you very much for your input.

Craig

peteski

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2017, 10:48:05 PM »
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Craig,  you didn't mention what color temperature will the LED lighting be for the layout.   White LEDs come in many different color temperatures.  If your LEDs are warm white (2700K) and your workbench will use daylight LEDs (4000-5000K) then you won't have a color match.  :|

I do agree that strong lighting is vital for working on N scale models.  At my workbench I have couple of magnifier lamps with "kitchen and bath" fluorescent bulbs (3000K) and couple of 20W goose-neck halogen lamps (also around 3000K) which can be adjusted to brightly illuminate the item I'm working on.  I don't have a layout so that is out of the picture.
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Chris333

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2017, 10:59:32 PM »
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I shoot for 4500-5500k for layout lighting.

wazzou

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2017, 12:30:27 AM »
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I have an under cabinet flourescent light about 3' above the bench and 2 Ott Lites, 1 double lamp at the rear of the bench and a single lamp from the right front.
Bryan

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djconway

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2017, 01:19:42 PM »
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I have florescent lights over the layout and my workbench.  I also have a swing arm magnifying light for when I need to do close work.  At 61 the magnifying light really helps with N to O scale work.

wazzou

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2017, 01:23:34 PM »
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At 61 the magnifying light really helps with N to O scale work.


You should try Reading Glasses like in the 2.5 to 2.75 range.   
My closeup vision has really deteriorated over the last few years and I wear these for any closeup work.
I cannot remember the last time I wore my Optivisor.
Bryan

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ednadolski

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2017, 02:43:22 PM »
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I do agree that strong lighting is vital for working on N scale models.

Not just for the workbench:  for my new layout I am planning >30 PAR38 LED floods.  I want to be able to see the models when they are running, not only when I am working on them.

Ed

mmagliaro

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2017, 03:07:31 PM »
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You should try Reading Glasses like in the 2.5 to 2.75 range.   
My closeup vision has really deteriorated over the last few years and I wear these for any closeup work.
I cannot remember the last time I wore my Optivisor.

At about age 43 (which the eye doctor tells me is typical), I had to start wearing reading classes for reading and close modeling work.  Now I'm 54, and I wear 2.5's, but get this, I wear an optivisor in addition to them.  You would think it awkward or difficult but it's not at all.   And I find I get very sharp, super-close vision for modeling work that way.

SP-Wolf

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2017, 03:13:39 PM »
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At about age 43 (which the eye doctor tells me is typical), I had to start wearing reading classes for reading and close modeling work.  Now I'm 54, and I wear 2.5's, but get this, I wear an optivisor in addition to them.  You would think it awkward or difficult but it's not at all.   And I find I get very sharp, super-close vision for modeling work that way.

Exactly the same for me. 2.5's and an optivisor.  Works great. I have a couple of LED work lights over my workbench as well. I do not remember what kelvin they are -but, close to daylight.

Wolf


robert3985

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2017, 03:35:43 PM »
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My entire layout room is lit with 5,000K LED bulbs (100W equivalents).  However, my workshop is lit with a mixture of halogen lights and big workshop florescent fixtures, except in my spray booth, which is 5,000K.

The deal is that in my layout room, I'm photographing a lot...so "daylight" color temp is important.  I also do my scenery work there, so consistent lighting is important.  However, in my workshop, seeing detail and small parts is most important so hence the combination of halogen and florescent bright lighting...except in the spray booth, where once again, seeing color as it appears on my layout is important sometimes.

For most people, shadowless lighting would probably best, but for me, since I am virtually blind in my left eye, I have to have a shadow on my work to tell me how close the parts are to each other when working on either attaching parts, or painting small details, such as grab irons, marker lights, or people.  Since I already know that the colors I'm using look like under "daylight" 5,000K lighting, I don't need to see a caboose red grab iron in its correct colors while applying paint to it under my halogen lamp, wearing my Optivisor...I need to see how close the paintbrush is to the part by observing how far the brush's shadow is from its tip...on the part I'm painting.

Unless you're attempting to match colors, having the same color temperature of light at both workbench and over the layout is not important most of the time.  Seeing details and small parts IS important, but color temp isn't IMO.  For the times when matching colors IS important, then having a lamp on your bench that matches the layout's color temp is necessary....but not for the whole workshop.

Cheerio!
Bob Gilmore

Cajonpassfan

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2017, 07:21:25 PM »
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I'm of the opinion that over the workbench, the amount of light is more important then its color (Of course, I do my painting and weathering elsewhere). I also like the light to come from more than one source. I have two powerful halogens over the bench; these can be set for bright, which I use for most work, and VERY bright for special needs.
Pics below, excuse the condition of the workspace.... :facepalm:
And yes, the Optivisor is my best friend...
Otto K.


peteski

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2017, 07:22:09 PM »
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At about age 43 (which the eye doctor tells me is typical), I had to start wearing reading classes for reading and close modeling work.  Now I'm 54, and I wear 2.5's, but get this, I wear an optivisor in addition to them.  You would think it awkward or difficult but it's not at all.   And I find I get very sharp, super-close vision for modeling work that way.

I am also of similar age and I do the same thing you do (reading glasses and Optivisor).  That way I can do extreme close-ups (lower the Optivisor hood) or keep it raised for less magnification.
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