Author Topic: Work area lighting.  (Read 1283 times)

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craigolio1

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2017, 08:11:50 PM »
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This is all really good info.

Peteski I havn't chosen my layout lighting yet but close to day light makes sense for photography and realistic look.

I won't be painting at my work bench so I guess it doesn't really matter too much that it matches the layout, however, since the work bench will be in use before the layout is built I think I should light it close to daylight. This way when I do have daylight lighting on my layout, and I view my models, they don't all look different then when I was building them.

Craig.

fotoflojoe

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2017, 09:18:00 PM »
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You should try Reading Glasses like in the 2.5 to 2.75 range.   
My closeup vision has really deteriorated over the last few years and I wear these for any closeup work.
I cannot remember the last time I wore my Optivisor.

Do those reading glasses serve as a reasonable substitute for the Optivisor?

My close-in eyesight has deteriorated a quite a bit over the past few years. When I go into the train room/workbench, very first thing I do is don the Optivisor - it doesn't come off until the session is over. Wearing it for such long spans does sometimes get uncomfortable, but I really like the ability to flip it up and out of the way at will.

To contribute an answer to Craig's lighting question: I use three 60 watt Cree warm white par 30 floods set into 12 inch clamping reflectors. They're clustered more-or-less evenly over the workbench. I use four more hung at various points, to light my tiny little 3x5 layout. Not the highest level of finish, but plenty of consistent light.

fotoflojoe

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2017, 09:22:36 PM »
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I am also of similar age and I do the same thing you do (reading glasses and Optivisor).  That way I can do extreme close-ups (lower the Optivisor hood) or keep it raised for less magnification.

Exactly what I do too, and for the same reasons.
Only difference is, mine are prescription "computer vision" glasses obtained for work.

wazzou

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2017, 11:36:51 PM »
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@fotoflojoe - I found the same problems of discomfort with the Optivisor over time + was dissatisfied with the shadows created by the lack of light allowed into the visor area. 
Reading glasses are much easier to put on and take off with little effort and kept low on the nose, I can see whatever else I need to at distances further than what I'm working on.
In addition, I don't have to tighten the knobs to keep the visor from falling down on the bridge of my nose.
I'm happy with the reading glass solution for now.
Bryan

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narrowminded

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2017, 12:10:13 AM »
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I use reading glasses and when that's not enough I add the optivisor.  And when it really needs help I use that rig with a magnifier desk lamp.  In a pinch you can also double or triple or... with the readers. :o  It's all the rage down at the home. 8)
« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 12:12:34 AM by narrowminded »
Mark G.

mark.hinds

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2017, 03:24:51 PM »
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I have always used Luxo flexible desk lamps for hobby work, as you can move them around to point exactly where you need them to.  These are the type of thing that Architects and draftsmen used to use.  For MR work, use a LED bulb in which matches the temperature of your layout lighting.  I have at least 6 of these in my hobby rooms at home, some of which were inherited from my father, who was an Architect. 

http://catalog.lightingspecialties.com/viewitems/luxo-office-lighting/luxo-l-series?s=g.base&gclid=CLfF1KXwiNICFdm2wAod3K0AKw

Note that early LED bulbs were too heavy for these lamps (which are supported by groups of balanced springs), but recent LED bulbs are comparable in weight to the old incandescents. 

Mark H. 
« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 03:27:21 PM by mark.hinds »

learmoia

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Re: Work area lighting.
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2017, 04:43:57 PM »
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I agree.. same style/color/lumens as the layout..

for me.. 6500K

~Ian
Don't Neglect the Jewel Case!