Author Topic: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove  (Read 665 times)

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nickelplate759

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Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« on: July 13, 2016, 11:15:16 AM »
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I'm installing a backdrop for a new u-shaped around-the-walls layout.   I like coved corners in the backdrop, and am installing them 3 of the 4 corners, but there's one corner that I'm not sure about.    In that corner there will be a multi-tracked industrial siding with a large factory right in the corner.   

If I build a square corner, then it's easy to fit in the factory and siding.  However, I need to disguise the corner above the factory - a partial water tower or smoke stack would help, but eventually the corner will show.

If I cove the corner (my coves have a 1-foot radius elsewhere - it's hard to get tighter with 1/8" Masonite), then fitting the factory is hard...

I'd like suggestions on how to choose.

George
George

NKPH&TS #3628

I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.

wazzou

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2016, 11:33:13 AM »
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My suggestion would be to cove the corner and either cut through the bottom of the backdrop in order to push the factory to the real corner and disguise this or shape the factory to match the cove in the corner.
Bryan

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Pomperaugrr

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2016, 12:12:06 PM »
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I would go with curving the corners of the backdrop and altering the rear corner of the building.  90 degree corners on backdrops cast some weird shadows at times.  You can use rooftop details to disguise the altered roofline of the building.

I have posted these before, but they illustrate the point.  I did that with my Kimberly Clark plant.  The building narrows as it runs along the backdrop toward the corner.  It is almost a forced perspective approach.  It sits about 4" in front of the backdrop on the right hand wall to compensate for the curve and to allow two tracks to pass behind, then through the building.

The building configuration changed a bit between the first and second photo, to better match the prototype and the space.




Eric
« Last Edit: July 13, 2016, 12:14:24 PM by Pomperaugrr »

nickelplate759

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2016, 07:19:11 PM »
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Thanks all.  I'm going with coved all around (pun intended) and will solve the building problem later.

George
George

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I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.

basementcalling

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2016, 09:21:01 PM »
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Cove the corner with vinyl.  It's super easy if you follow the steps in this article in MRH. http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/magazine/mrh-2011-04-Apr/coved_corners

I used these methods on my layout's backdrop corners and like the results.
Peter Pfotenhauer

Maletrain

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2016, 04:55:24 PM »
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Have you though about putting a really tall smoke stack in the corner, with a cotton "smoke" plume above that runs up the corner at the low end?  You could cove the backdrop only above the smoke stack, in a conical fashion, as you bring the smoke plume off the verticle, so that everything blends into the flats.  It would require some special lighting to make it blend without shadows.

nickelplate759

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Re: Backdrop - to Cove or Not to Cove
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 05:48:24 PM »
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Have you though about putting a really tall smoke stack in the corner, with a cotton "smoke" plume above that runs up the corner at the low end?  You could cove the backdrop only above the smoke stack, in a conical fashion, as you bring the smoke plume off the verticle, so that everything blends into the flats.  It would require some special lighting to make it blend without shadows.

I did indeed consider just that.  Other posters have convinced me that I'll like the coved area better.

Thanks,
GEorge
George

NKPH&TS #3628

I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that.