Author Topic: Odd container with odd load  (Read 702 times)

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nkalanaga

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Odd container with odd load
« on: May 09, 2016, 01:04:38 AM »
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This site has probably been mentioned before, but I know I haven't seen the pictures.  For intermodal modelers, I don't think this will fit a well car:


For the big picture and caption:
http://www.alaskarails.org/sf/strange-freight/ME-tele-poles.html

The index is at http://www.alaskarails.org/sf/strange-freight/
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loyalton

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2016, 08:14:35 AM »
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Really nice range of loads showing how to do tiedowns and such. I really like the use of those container-type flats; I don't think we have the "ventilated" and waffle-side types in N(?)


nkalanaga

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2016, 01:53:24 AM »
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I suspect that ARR gets loads than most American railroads wouldn't, because it's easier than hauling the stuff up in a ship, putting it on a truck, and driving it to the Interior, especially in the winter.  Many of the loads are probably put on a railcar in Seattle and barged up.

I still wonder why the poles are in a short container.  Why not just put them on the flatcar?  They'd have to be on top of the stack on a container ship, and on a general freighter they could just tie the bundle of poles to the deck.
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loyalton

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 07:39:04 AM »
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Guessing it would be possible to transfer the whole load in one go using the yellow flat. Looking at the pole tapers, someone did balance the load. But that's normal.

It's unclear to me if the poles are inbound or outbound from Whittier, by ship or rail or truck or combination thereof.

nkalanaga

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2016, 02:19:32 AM »
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I doubt that they're outbound by ship.  As common as creosoting plants are in the Lower 48, I can't see someone buying creosoted poles from Alaska.  I don't know if Alaska has a creosoting plant, so these could have come in by ship, or rail barge, or have been treated in Alaska, traveling entirely be ARR.
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peteski

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2016, 03:16:48 AM »
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I wonder if they used that special container simply because it had stakes (like logging tucks do) to prevent the poles from rolling off the sides of the flat car?
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nkalanaga

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Re: Odd container with odd load
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2016, 12:45:24 PM »
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They could have, and my first thought on seeing it was that it was a flat with log bunks, but I doubt it.  More likely they came in by ship, already in the container, and the entire load was moved by container crane.  With almost all ports having at least basic container-handling equipment, it would be easier than rigging and lifting with a conventional crane, and probably much easier than finding a log loader.

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