Author Topic: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"  (Read 14127 times)

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Hawghead

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #90 on: July 01, 2019, 11:13:58 AM »
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Peter,

This is really looking great.  As someone who takes trains through this area almost every day, the pictures of the different parts of your layout look very familiar to me.  Almost all of the industries or the tracks that once served them are gone now, but looking at the different parts of your layout I find myself thinking, Oh, that's what used to be there.

Scott
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sirenwerks

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #91 on: July 01, 2019, 06:54:21 PM »
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Hmmm...stop in Vegas, only 1111 miles from my house....I might have to pass....how about the Orange Empire Railway Museum?


Is Arizona even on the West Coast? When I lived in NM it associated itself with the Southwest, so I kinda associated it with not being on a coast at all, and I don't think Lakes Mead or Havusa constitute a coast
Now seeking Pacific NW N scalers to create a Modutrak-style modular club featuring NP's shared mainline between Seattle and Portland. PM me if interested.

CRL

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #92 on: July 01, 2019, 08:33:52 PM »
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If the big one ever hits, folks in Arizona will be sticking pry bars into the Colorado River trying to lever California into the ocean.

sirenwerks

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #93 on: July 02, 2019, 02:04:05 PM »
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If the big one ever hits, folks in Arizona will be sticking pry bars into the Colorado River trying to lever California into the ocean.


The Big One is a myth in regards to California. Yes, it will have big earthquakes, but an earthquake the full length of the San Andreas is pretty much a non-starter.


That will occur, however, along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The CSZ runs along the coast from BC down Washington and Oregon to Humboldt County CA. It's estimated there will be a 6' or so drop in land elevations along that coast when another major event happens. That may drop parts of some towns into the water.


The details are fuzzy at the moment, but I remember reading about one town in Italy that is on a subduction zone, where there's an ancient port that's been lifted by subduction about 30' above the modern town, which is now at sea level. That's the power of plate tectonics.


The fact is that the majority of California is not on a subduction zone to make your fantasy a reality. Keep wishing if you want, but your fantasy is not based on science/reality.
[/size]
[/size]You might want to focus your attention instead on the unnamed fault near Duncan, which last produced a magnitude 5.3, and is part of the Northern Arizona Seismic Belt, which runs from Flagstaff to Utah, and includes dozens of other unnamed active faults. Or the Lake Mary Fault just south of Flagstaff, capable of a magnitude of 7; or the Hurricane Fault, also in northern Arizona, capable of a 7.5 magnitude; or the Algodones Fault in southwestern Arizona (6.6 magnitude), the Big Chino Fault in central Arizona (7 magnitude), the Safford Fault in eastern Arizona (6.5 magnitude), or the Santa Rita Fault southeast of Tucson (7 magnitude). Who knows, maybe Arizona will become an inland sea again and solve LA and the Central Valley's water problems?
Now seeking Pacific NW N scalers to create a Modutrak-style modular club featuring NP's shared mainline between Seattle and Portland. PM me if interested.

johnb

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #94 on: July 02, 2019, 02:11:00 PM »
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Is Arizona even on the West Coast? When I lived in NM it associated itself with the Southwest, so I kinda associated it with not being on a coast at all, and I don't think Lakes Mead or Havusa constitute a coast
it's South West, but a lot closer to you than the ConRail guys

CRL

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #95 on: July 02, 2019, 04:03:09 PM »
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The Big One is a myth in regards to California. Yes, it will have big earthquakes, but an earthquake the full length of the San Andreas is pretty much a non-starter.


That will occur, however, along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The CSZ runs along the coast from BC down Washington and Oregon to Humboldt County CA. It's estimated there will be a 6' or so drop in land elevations along that coast when another major event happens. That may drop parts of some towns into the water.


The details are fuzzy at the moment, but I remember reading about one town in Italy that is on a subduction zone, where there's an ancient port that's been lifted by subduction about 30' above the modern town, which is now at sea level. That's the power of plate tectonics.


The fact is that the majority of California is not on a subduction zone to make your fantasy a reality. Keep wishing if you want, but your fantasy is not based on science/reality.
[/size]
[/size]You might want to focus your attention instead on the unnamed fault near Duncan, which last produced a magnitude 5.3, and is part of the Northern Arizona Seismic Belt, which runs from Flagstaff to Utah, and includes dozens of other unnamed active faults. Or the Lake Mary Fault just south of Flagstaff, capable of a magnitude of 7; or the Hurricane Fault, also in northern Arizona, capable of a 7.5 magnitude; or the Algodones Fault in southwestern Arizona (6.6 magnitude), the Big Chino Fault in central Arizona (7 magnitude), the Safford Fault in eastern Arizona (6.5 magnitude), or the Santa Rita Fault southeast of Tucson (7 magnitude). Who knows, maybe Arizona will become an inland sea again and solve LA and the Central Valley's water problems?

So basically you’re saying they will need bigger pry bars.