Author Topic: An O scale turnout  (Read 4894 times)

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svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2015, 09:27:15 AM »
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I that that this type of hopper ended up with Wisconsin Central reporting marks.
It seems so. At least those that ATSF designated as class GA-143.

Actually, if you look close you can see that the photos I provided are for GA-137 cars and the first of Ed's links is for a GA-136 car. Similar but then not I guess, even if I fail to spot the difference.  :facepalm:
Lennart

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #31 on: May 17, 2015, 10:03:38 AM »
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Seems like the Atlas car I got, ATSF 304033 with class GA-143, never existed  :? The car number and the class do not match. The class for that number should have been GA-137. At least if you trust this information:
Ga-137 Covered Hopper, Series 303100-304099 built 1964
Ga-143 Covered Hopper, Series 304100-305099 built 1965
which at matches the pictures.

A reason to renumber it and wheater it like this? http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=373923  :D

Lennart

ednadolski

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2015, 09:49:23 PM »
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I'm learning that while certainly possible with O scale it is no small feat to model with very strict proto fidelity.  There are too many variations among the prototypes; the number of O scale models produced is quite limited and entails many compromises; and detail parts/decals/etc are hard to come by and often must be custom-made.

That all said, I'm also finding that O scale modeling is very rewarding for other reasons.  The in-person 'presence' of the models; the possible level of detailing, sound quality; and operable features (e.g. couplers, lift bars, and rotating bearing caps) are all things that are rewarding because they so difficult or impossible to achieve in other scales.

To summarize, it's all about which trade-offs interest you the most.

Ed

ednadolski

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2015, 10:47:25 AM »
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I'm learning that while certainly possible with O scale it is no small feat to model with very strict proto fidelity.

One additional proviso:  within O scale, it's probably an order of magnitude more difficult to do proto modeling with modern era, as opposed to steam/transition.

And just one other cool thing about that hopper, you can read all the lettering without a magnifier ;)

Ed

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #34 on: May 21, 2015, 03:57:45 PM »
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To summarize, it's all about which trade-offs interest you the most.
Exactly! And luckily for me I am not after strict proto fidelity. I want things to look believable, in my own eyes. Of course, that means the more I learn the more fidelity is needed. But in that way I can make it in small steps, as I happen to pick knowledge and have time to absorb it.

To suddenly, and more or less by accident, realize that some of these more or less look-alike hoppers were class GA-137 while others were GA-143 is a good example of the kind of small but interesting info that one may use or not. And hopefully nobody jumps on you if you should not  :facepalm:
Lennart

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2015, 04:19:09 AM »
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I have know received new /115 thread wheels from North West Short Line, along with matching bushings. Dave at NWSL was very helpful. I just told him what I wanted to achieve, and he suggested suitable parts. Thanks Dave.




To be up and running again (pardon the pun) was a simple matter of removing the old wheels and bushings from the axles, and sliding (or pushing rather) the new ones on. Some careful track gauge matching got them rolling nicely through the turnout.


New wheels below, old above.


Test rolling.


The new wheels are pre-weathered which was an improvement in itself.


A nice fit between the guard and stock rails.

While waiting for the wheels to eventually manage across the Atlantic I have been building a shelf for the new (very short) layout. It is very light-weight. Just foam glued inside a wooden frame, and sitting on a few brackets. It is remarkably sturdy anyway.


Posing on the new shelf. The turnout assembly will not sit on top of the foam, but will be lowered into it, while new track will be laid on the foam.

Lennart

GaryHinshaw

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2015, 01:11:07 PM »
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That looks amazing.  It's a shame that products like these form such a niche market, but it's good to see a few brave souls forging ahead. Keep the updates coming!

ednadolski

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2015, 03:50:51 PM »
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Those new wheels with the smaller flanges and improved profile look great!   Even in the straight-end shot it is hard to tell that they are a 5' gauge, so from the normal side viewing angle of a shelf it will be pretty hard to notice any gauge difference.  I can't wait to see what the turnout looks like with the rest of the shelf built up around it!   8)

new track will be laid on the foam.

One suggestion:  put down a layer of 1/2" homasote (or some other similar, good sound-absorbing material).  I've found that track laid straight on foam transmits a *lot* of noise from the locomotive (even a small loco at slow speed).  Even cork really isn't all that effective, homasote is much better if you can get that.

Ed



svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #38 on: June 07, 2015, 02:18:08 AM »
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... it's good to see a few brave souls forging ahead.
Brave? What about those 70,000+ pandrol clips  :D
(Don't get me wrong. I really admire you for doing that)

One suggestion:  put down a layer of 1/2" homasote (or some other similar, good sound-absorbing material).
Good point Ed. I had not thought about that  :facepalm: I did however plan to have some kind of roadbed, since I am afraid the foam will not hold up when rail spikes are driven into ties glued directly on to it. But on the other hand I don't want much of a roadbed profile either, so it can't be anything to thick. I want the track to look as if laid more directly on the ground.

Pelle S√łeborg had an article in MR a couple of years ago where he showed how he used asphalt/bitumen mats, the stuff you use for sound dampening in cars. I don't know if that stuff is hard enough or if it is to soft, but now when you have had me remember the sound aspect I think I shall check it out.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 05:09:29 AM by svedblen »
Lennart

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #39 on: June 13, 2015, 04:44:49 PM »
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The other day I went to an auto parts dealer and bought a 4-pack of bitumen mats.



It is soft enough to cut with a knife and to drive spikes into. But it still seems stiff enough to take up the pressure when ties are spiked. Here is a slice cut to tie width.



Yes, it looks kind of "wavy". The thing is self-adhesive and hopefully it will stick to the foam and the waviness go away.
Lennart

Jesse6669

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2015, 11:22:05 AM »
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Is this the same thing as the old AMI Instant Roadbed?

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2015, 03:37:51 PM »
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Is this the same thing as the old AMI Instant Roadbed?
I don't think so. I have no experience of AMI Instant Roadbed, but a search on the web says it was made of butyl rubber, which is a synthetic rubber. Bitumen on the other hand is an asphalt-like product. A kind of semi-solid form of petroleum.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2015, 04:38:31 PM by svedblen »
Lennart

ednadolski

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #42 on: June 16, 2015, 02:01:31 PM »
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Yes that looks similar to what I recall about PKS using.  I'm not sure offhand if he had also put down a layer of cork over that (I may be thinking of some other article from MR).

As for the waviness, it seems you could probably work out most of that by stretching it slightly as you lay it down.  You don't have any sharp curves, and code 125 (or larger) rail is pretty stiff anyways, so it does not seem like it should be much of a concern while operating.

(I had looked for that material a while back, but could only find the foil-covered version for automobiles.  It would probably also be handy installed on the outside of a metal spray booth to keep down the noise.)   ;)

Ed

svedblen

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #43 on: June 22, 2015, 12:12:40 PM »
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The switch stand I had installed was from Grandt Line. It was a good looking plastic switch stand, and it could actually move the points. But it did not lock the points in place, and being plastic it felt a bit vulnerable. So I sat out to find something else, and finally found a brass switch stand from Red Cliff Miniatures.

After quite a bit of fiddling I managed to install it, and have it move and lock the points. The hard bit was to get the point end of the throw-rod to move just as much as needed to move the points, and at the same time allow the switch stand end to move a larger distance in order for the handle to reach the position where it locked.

Red Cliff Miniatures has a solution for that problem - a throw bar with a spring that takes up the excess movement. But I did not want to use it since it would look out of place and non-prototypical. Instead I managed to construct a two part throw-rod where a "hook" in one part could slide inside a groove or run in the other part.

Here is the new switch stand installed, painted and weathered.



Points are thrown by lifting the handle, turning it, and lowering into the locked position.



With the switch stand fixed at last, I can now move on - install the turnout assembly on (or rather in) the layout shelf, lay roadbed and then track.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2015, 12:16:12 PM by svedblen »
Lennart

ednadolski

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Re: An O scale turnout
« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2021, 03:08:18 PM »
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Revisiting this thread after having bookmarked away, and I gotta say I'm still struck awestruck by how good all your pics look  8)

Ed
« Last Edit: February 18, 2021, 03:48:38 PM by ednadolski »