Author Topic: Death of a Trainmaster  (Read 2043 times)

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Doug G.

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2015, 08:08:34 PM »
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Don't the paint look nice, though.

:D

Doug
Atlas First Generation Motive Power and Treble-O-Lectric. Click on the link:
www.irwinsjournal.com/a1g/a1glocos/

parkrrrr

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2015, 07:57:43 PM »
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I'm surprised that the oven could melt solder joints.  That oven must be really out of whack, or
they use low temperature solder.

I once used a toaster oven to bake some glass enamel onto a stained glass project I was doing. The enamel was supposed to cure at 325 degrees, so I set the oven to that, but it overcooked the enamel (the white turned brown) and melted absolutely all of the solder joints.

My theory is that while some part of the oven was at 325, and maybe even the average temperature was 325, there's a significant gradient close to the heating element.

I still use that toaster oven, but now I use an industrial PID controller and a thermocouple lying directly adjacent to the work to control the temperature.

rschaffter

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2015, 09:48:14 PM »
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I'm surprised that the oven could melt solder joints.  That oven must be really out of whack, or
they use low temperature solder.
Low melting point solders are sometimes used to add parts to soldered assemblies without melting the initial joints...
Cheers,
Rod Schaffter

alhoop

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2015, 10:15:59 AM »
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Ron:
You will need one of these to do the heavy work --  made from a soldering iron that has screws
to hold the tip in - the tip is made from the carbon rod from a carbon-zinc cell (Alkaline will not work
as the center rod is mushy). I can't remember if it was from a C cell or a D cell - measure to fit.

Just remember to never touch or remove the iron tip to the work with the foot switch activated or
you will be arc welding. Also be prepared to burn some holes in thin brass until you get the setting just right.

Al
« Last Edit: June 18, 2015, 11:03:28 AM by alhoop »

mionerr

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2015, 11:03:15 AM »
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Ron, this is why food dehydrators are *MUCH* safer way to speed up paint drying. 

NOW you post this. I just gave away my dehydrator.

It consumes as much energy as a 40 W light bulb.

Seems a simple thing to make; kinda like the ovens they used to sell for kids to bake things in. A bit of experimenting with different wattage bulbs to vary the heat or use a dimmer. And a thermometer.
Roger Otto
Pueblo, CO

JMaurer1

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Re: Death of a Trainmaster
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2015, 12:32:23 PM »
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It's TOTALLY fixable. Can you say epoxy?
Sacramento Valley NTrak