Author Topic: Painting resin models  (Read 1496 times)

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Joetrain59

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Painting resin models
« on: March 03, 2014, 04:40:42 PM »
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  I'm currently assembling the Hell Gate Models PRR B60-b kit. They recommend Badger Modelflex paint. But I need spray bombs. Also have the ESM Keyser Valley caboose to eventually paint. Do they need to be primed? If so, what's good? Weaver ScalecoatII perhaps, as well as their paint. But I might have some Pollyscale/Floquil Tuscan laying around.
 Thanks for any advice,
 Joe D

Puddington

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2014, 04:50:20 PM »
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I've used Tamiya primer for years on my resin passenger fleet and had little or no issues. We're experimenting with Testers CreateFX super fine white as a lacquer primer here with good initial results.
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casmmr

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2014, 06:49:12 PM »
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IL would wash the model with Dawn liquid dish washing soap, rinse well and let air dry.  Check on any bubbles or other imperfections that need attention, fix those and re-wash and  dry.  Then, use a light gray or darker gray depending upon your final color for a primer/base coat.  Spray your final color and you should be done with your painting.  I use Scale Coat II, for my final color and after decaling, coat with Testor's Matt.  If I could ever figure out how to take good pictures, I would post some of both my engines/cars and buildings/t-trak modules.  Have fun, Craig

bbussey

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 12:18:46 AM »
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You shouldn't have to prime them.  As long as the resin surfaces are clean of oils from your fingers and of mold release residue, the paint will hold.
Bryan Busséy
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Joetrain59

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 12:51:20 AM »
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Thanks for that info Bryan. Less paint = more detail to come through.
 Thanks,
 Joe D

Joetrain59

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2014, 01:47:18 AM »
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Did the LIRR have B60b's? Saw this, while searching for proto photos;
http://www.amazon.com/Walthers-Scale-Pennsylvania-Class-Baggage/dp/B000EXIPQ4

jimmo

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2014, 01:52:00 AM »
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+1 to what Brian said. I never primer my models.

We sometimes forget that most model paint is made with smaller grains of pigment so it covers better and thinner than 1:1 paint.
James R. Will

Angus Shops

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2014, 02:30:08 AM »
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I use Scalecoat paint for most of my finish coatings, and found through experience that they bonded poorly to resin, even after careful washing (warm, not hot, water with dish detergent and a thorough rinse). Experimentation revealed that Testors Model Masters Military Colours in rattle cans was a great 'primer'. I still use it but it's becoming harder to find now that Testors is messing with their product lines. 'Light gull grey' for light coloured models, 'light earth' for darker schemes, and flat black under black schemes. I apply the lightest coat I can lay down; erring on the side of too light is better than to heavy.

Geoff

peteski

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2014, 02:56:56 AM »
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I also prefer to avoid primer (as it does add to the total thickness of the paint finish).  I use even stronger degreasers/cleaners.  I also start by washing the parts in warm water and dish-washing detergent (I use Joy).  Then, since urethane resins are resistant to solvents, I wash them using naphtha, or sometimes lacquer thinner.  That pretty much guarantees that there is no mold release residue.

But primers are useful when filler is used on the resin parts. Primer smooths the surface, and it blends the different surface texture of the filler, creating uniform surface over the entire piece.
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jimmo

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2014, 01:45:03 PM »
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But primers are useful when filler is used on the resin parts. Primer smooths the surface, and it blends the different surface texture of the filler, creating uniform surface over the entire piece.

True, but in those circumstances I generally use a Tamiya flat spray (bomb) as a thin layer of primer followed by a topcoat of the same color if there is no more work required on the surface.
James R. Will

johnh35

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2014, 02:12:45 PM »
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I always use the Tamiya fine white primer on resin models. It goes on extremely thin and I have never had paint adhesion problems when using it.

DKS

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2014, 02:19:47 PM »
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If you also paint RP models, then you may have Bestine sitting around. Bestine is a great degreaser--much less obnoxious than naptha or mineral spirits, and much quicker than dishwashing soap.

The only time I use primer is if the model has a wide variety of surface colors; for instance, if it combines etched brass or styrene parts. This helps create a more consistent finish color.
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mmagliaro

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2014, 04:24:32 PM »
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I cleaned my B60 with dish detergent and let dry.  I painted with Scalecoat I  (the solvent-based one).

It holds like iron.  I've never had a problem with paint flaking or scratching off this car.
http://www.maxcowonline.com/maxspage/projectFiles.php?projectStringData=picdir%3DbaggageCars%26picidx%3D16%26lastpic%3D3%26picstyle%3D0%26

Joetrain59

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2014, 06:59:03 PM »
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Max that looks great. Shows more grabs than instructions show. Esp. that crazy angled grab on one end.
 But you have one truck assembled wrong. I put Z905's on mine. The provided holes were a bit off-center.
 Joe D

mmagliaro

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Re: Painting resin models
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2014, 11:01:48 PM »
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Max that looks great. Shows more grabs than instructions show. Esp. that crazy angled grab on one end.
 But you have one truck assembled wrong. I put Z905's on mine. The provided holes were a bit off-center.
 Joe D

Thanks Joe.  I copied the grabs based on photos.  I just made them all out of wire.

What truck is wrong?   And what's wrong with it?   I want to fix it.