Author Topic: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"  (Read 15564 times)

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pdx1955

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #105 on: January 03, 2020, 04:10:01 PM »
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Then, on the other side of the layout (however not on the priority list in the Challenges thread, but these were in my to-do stack at the workbench), is the start of representing the large coal gas holders in this location. I cut the N scale Walthers version in half to represent two of the three that were here. If I had the room, I really should use the HO version to be in the correct cubic feet ballpark  , but we can't have everything. Both of these will be mounted on substantial concrete foundations to match the prototype which will raise these an inch or more and allow to be better fitted into the scenery. All of the steel will be painted a hull/Navy gray as they certainly aren't black in my photographs.

Also, to the left is the first industrial flat along the backdrop as there were a number of industrial structures that flanked the Brooklyn yard area with at least one saw-tooth roofed one. This is a old Model Power structure that I bashed into a single building with my own version of standing seam roofing (scribing styrene with a old blade plows up the plastic on both sides of the cut creating a noticeable ridge - this works for this 2+ foot view . I still have to paint the roof, foundation, and weather the whole thing.


« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 04:31:08 PM by pdx1955 »
Peter

"No one ever died because of a bad question, but bad assumptions can kill"

OldEastRR

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Re: SP's East Portland "Produce Row"
« Reply #106 on: January 04, 2020, 02:30:50 AM »
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I remember that "bump-out" article in MR because it was part of the continuing series on David Popp's New Haven N layout. I really like that series because it showed how a simple 4x8 oval-type layout plan slowly evolved into a long linear U-shaped one. I was disappointed the "How To" build it book from Kalmbach changed it into one final giant project done step by step, rather than how it grew and morphed. MR did do that concept once "The HO Layout That Grows" which promoted the idea that you could start with a small layout then add to it. Allen's G&D layout did exactly this. Sellios' FS&M was another. Doesn't seem to be a mainstream idea these days.